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I Am Often The Only Woman in the Room, Yet It Was Never a Predicament. Here's Why

2min read
Business

Over the last year, I've been asked a lot about how it feels to be a female in the predominantly male advertising industry. More often than not I respond with a puzzled look because truth be told, I have never really faced adversity in my career. So, I have to wonder why? Why has my experience been different than so many others? After all, it's true – I'm a female Creative Director, and when I started climbing the career ladder I was one of the 3%. I have worked for men in almost all of my jobs, sat in many conference rooms where I was the only female, and yet I still didn't feel like this was any kind of “predicament."


I needed to understand WHY.

What I discovered was a commonality among the people I surrounded myself with and worked for. As I moved along my career path, and interviewed and accepted positions, I ended up working for men who naturally empower women. These men were expressive, kind mentors who challenged me and wanted to give me the floor when I was ready. No different than the way people have habits in romantic relationships, being drawn to people who may treat them in a certain way (good or bad!) – I believe I had a natural inclination towards bosses who would give me responsibility, let me shine, mentor me with respect, value my opinion, but most importantly allow me to challenge them.

Challenging myself and those around me is part of my DNA, and something that I am realizing comes from my Jewish upbringing. Growing up, I attended private yeshivahs where it was common to juggle nine Hebrew subjects, many of which were devoted to “probing ancient Jewish texts" to seek deeper meaning and truth.

These were deep commentaries where one could spend hours agonizing about the meanings behind a single word or examining multiple viewpoints.

This habit of questioning everything was prized growing up, and “thinking for oneself" was a quality I was encouraged to embody.

At the time, I probably complained about staying in school for 12 hours, but now I am thankful I have the rigor to volley with the best strategists, argue the merits of a headline, question the briefs, or our goals and objectives. At the heart of this learning style is also the ability to walk around and see things empathetically from various points of view.

As I envision the environments in which women don't succeed - it is where their opinion is not equal, or valued or if they aren't being HEARD or given the credit nor credence of their point of view. It's not like I haven't encountered the industry clichés.

I have had to shut down unwelcome advances, and have shouted above the fray of male colleagues with a booming voice, but I now realize that I am lucky it wasn't worse. I was fortunate to be spared a lot of what has plagued my industry – women who have been shamed, coerced and made to feel uncomfortable. Sadly, it is becoming clear that my situation is unique.

So, my advice to women of all ages, ethnicities, level of seniority and even industry: Be careful where you spend your time - don't just size up the work opportunities when deciding on your next move - consider the ecosystem.

Think about the way you felt in an interview, ask to meet the people you will be working with directly – make sure the environment is hospitable towards not just you, but women as a whole. Even after you have accepted a position - always continue asking yourself if you feel heard, supported and equal. If the answer is no, move on and find your tribe - because it's out there, I promise you.

We are living in exciting times – with a seismic shift upon us – #metoo and #timesup are not just moments- but movements that are defining our here and now and also creating a BEFORE and an AFTER. They are allowing our shared voices to have power, and conversations to be had out loud.

I hope this movement makes it easier for any woman to walk away from a situation that doesn't serve her – and to find support. Women are lifting others up in a way that I didn't see when I was moving through the ranks- and it's thrilling to witness.

I know that as a female leader in my field, the most important role I have is possibly as a shelter – where other women can come to talk or seek advice, but it is also my job to create a safe, welcoming environment for anyone who hasn't had a voice in the past.

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5 Min Read
Culture

Global Beauty: What's Trending In Aesthetic Medicine? With Dr. Rahi

I recently traveled to Paris to attend the International Master Course on Aging Science (IMCAS) and met with some incredible doctors from around the world to learn the latest trends in aesthetic medicine— the field of improving cosmetic appearance through medical procedures. My practice in Los Angeles serves a truly diverse and international clientele, and these conferences are a great way for me bring the latest global procedures and products back home for my patients.


Here are my three biggest global beauty takeaways from the trip! Face threads are an increasingly popular procedure to quickly and efficiently rejuvenate your look, and they can be easily tailored to your needs. The V-shape jawline contour is big in South Korea, if you're looking for something more transformative. Whereas women in Paris are embracing the art of aging naturally while still looking flawless with the help of minimally invasive threads.

Another big trend in global beauty is the process of utilizing radiofrequency therapy to heat the skin in order to reduce lines and loose skin. This incredibly advanced technology is now being used all over the body, especially on the face and vagina.

Finally, this may not be a specific global beauty trend, but the gender dynamics of beauty are majorly shifting in terms of both providers and patients. More women are entering aesthetics as providers and more men are utilizing aesthetics as patients. Italy has a quickly growing population of male patients, and in Brazil the gender breakdown is already 50/50!

Those were my major global beauty lessons from this trip, but I also spoke with several doctors directly about how their practices are shifting with the times. Here are some of the amazing doctors from all over the globe that I had the pleasure of meeting with in Paris, as well the latest products and therapies they recommend! The world of beauty is shifting, and we're going right to the source.

Dr. Rahi with Dr. Bernard Peyronnet

Dr. Bernard Peyronnet is a dermatologic surgeon whose patients include French celebrities and international royalty. He's based in the heart of Paris, working out of a gorgeous office that doubles as his home. Dr. Peyronnet revolutionized aesthetics by introducing the noninvasive chemical peel. He also loves adding subtle threads to a woman's face or body to create natural-looking improvements in contour, texture, or lift. French women never want to look like they've had work done. He calls his method the "French touch," which results in flawless results that keep everyone guessing.

As you can see, there have been some truly amazing global beauty advances in the field of aesthetic medicine, with doctors around the world continuing to innovate and refine their offerings. My time in Paris was so informative and inspiring, and I cannot wait to pass some of that knowledge on to my patients (and you!). If you would like to learn more about how the newest trends in aesthetics can help you achieve your desired look, please contact my office at doctorrahi.com to book a consultation!