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How PR Went From A Luxury To A Necessity In A Digital Age

Business

Ashley Crouch is a woman of many talents. As the founder of Appleseed Communications, a premier PR firm for female entrepreneurs, Crouch knows the ins and outs of public relations like nobody else. Impressively, she also created Master the Media, an online publicity accelerator for business-owners who want to take their companies to the next level.


Crouch is also an award-winning visibility strategist and has written for the likes of Forbes, The New York Times, Business Insider, TIME.com and Refinery29, just to name a few.

We chatted with the PR expert about the changes she has witnessed in the industry, what she sees for the future of media and about tips on how to be the most successful in business.

1. Can you speak a little about how PR has changed in the past decade?

The landscape of public relations has dramatically shifted in the past ten years allowing individuals to hold more power than ever before.

First, the rise of social media has democratized how stories are heard, shared, and picked up by the more “traditional" media outlets. It has given the average person access to top journalists to pitch story ideas, and also share their stories with a global audience. For example, in the case of the #MeToo phenomenon, stories go viral in a matter of hours with global hashtag movements.

Second, media outlets have become increasingly fragmented, specialized and niche, which allows for high concentration of specific audiences and could help generate better ROI, but also allows groups of people to silo themselves off from one another creating cultural blind spots. Political groups are often caught off guard by the success of various candidates because they truly “never saw it coming."

Third, stories are pitched and shared in less formalized ways than ever. Press releases are much less effective and many stories get pitched through text message or growth hacking techniques baked into the product or company itself (encouragement to share on social, take action, sign a petition, are all examples that could lead to publicity). I teach people how to share their stories in pitch letters for maximum impact. It is easier than ever, if one has the skills.

Fourth, companies can generate their own “media" through video and content creation, then cross-publish it on large, national and global outlets, such as Huffington Post or Thrive Global. Or, articles can go “viral" on platforms like LinkedIn and lead to television opportunities for the thought leader.

Fifth, staff writers within media outlets are being let go at accelerated rates, creating a vast pool of high-quality freelance journalists that write for many outlets. If a person knows how to find them and build relationships, it can increase their chances of being featured on national platforms, because there are many outlets one journalist could assign the story.

Sixth, PR was often considered a luxury available to large companies with big budgets. Today, I consider it the new critical life skill that all individuals can and should learn how to do. By the year 2020, at least 40% of America's workforce will be freelancers. These individuals need to know how to position, differentiate, and leverage media to set themselves up for success. My mission is to train 1000 women how to package and share their story in the next six months.

Ashley Crouch

2. When you launched Appleseed, what was the white space you were looking to fill?

Appleseed began to offer women entrepreneurs premier PR services at an affordable price point. Since that time, we have become the first “one for one" PR company to exist through our Seed Fund Project; for every client served, we offer microloans to women entrepreneurs in resource-poor nations to grow their businesses. We are working in nine countries right now with this profit for purpose model.

We just expanded our offerings to include an all-inclusive online visibility accelerator to teach the A-Z techniques for publicity and partner with the best in the industry for training on what really works. Our school of visibility, Master the Media, teaches entrepreneurs around the globe the principles of how to get media, write for top publications, speak on stages (and get paid), and leverage social media for maximum ROI.

3. We've all heard the dismal numbers in regards to how much funding female founders receive vs. men. Can you tell us any thoughts on how to counteract this?

Businesses need three basic things to be successful: 1. a great product, 2. funding in the form of paying clients, customers or investors, and 3. a powerful story. Which comes first? Not every business requires venture capital to be successful. But a company with funding but no story can fall flat. I teach how to package and share your story to leverage media, attract qualified clients and customers or investors if necessary, and demonstrate social proof and credibility. As for moving the needle with venture capital, the more we can increase the legitimacy of female-founded businesses and their proven success rates, the more we can normalize these ventures as sound investments. There are investment funds launching that focus or prioritize female funded businesses, and accelerators designed to help women entrepreneurs reach 1 million in revenue.

4. Editors are no longer necessarily associated with just one publication, how do you keep on top of all the turnover?

Often, media databases are not up-to-date, since there is so much turnover. They are also usually out of reach for small businesses or entrepreneurs to afford. Instead, you need the skill set to know how to find the most up to date contact information and build relationships that transition through all platforms. For example, I pitched a story that went viral to the Senior Style Editor at Huffington Post back in 2013. In 2014, she moved to Mic. and offered to let me write a story for them. Now she is at Racked and we still keep in touch. It is about building real friendships, which I teach how to do.

5. What is the undercurrent philosophy of good PR, if you had to describe it in a few words?

Understand how to package and share your story for maximum impact in media.

I developed a proven Formula that anyone can use to plug in their message. It is already proven to work for students around the globe. You can access it here.

6. What are common PR mistakes you see people making over and over?
There are five common reasons why people fail at generating media attention:
  1. They don't know what to say or how to tell their story well.
  2. They don't know who to contact so they never pitch themselves at all.
  3. They pitch themselves, but did it wrong and never heard back. (There are so many reasons people mess up a great pitch opportunity, such as a terrible e-mail title, a boring pitch letter, no story idea, making it too long, not including the right information, and many more. I give people my 5 time-tested pitch templates that proven to work here.)
  4. They didn't follow up.
  5. They got the opportunity and were not prepared, so the interview fell flat.

Happily, I teach how to overcome all of these problems with a free online masterclass, 7 Ways to Get Media Attention [In Half the Time].

7. What are the rules for using social media to pitch? Is it inappropriate?

Social media is an excellent tool for generating high-quality media opportunities if done well. For example, I secured an opportunity to produce one week of radio shows for SiriusXM radio for a new fashion brand - during New York Fashion Week - all from a well-timed tweet to a stranger. It must be done well.

For example, leverage social media to begin getting to know a specific journalist, their interests, hobbies, and how they view the world. Engage with them in an authentic personal way. This detective work will help you put your best foot forward when it is time to pitch.

8. You talk about how female entrepreneurs need "a celebration tribe." Can you explain what that is and why it's so important?

Men brag constantly. It is a hallmark characteristic of their performance, networking behavior, and upward social movement. It alerts everyone of their achievements and capability. Women, however, often feel uncomfortable sharing their wins. When speaking with women entrepreneurs around the world about why they did or did not share their professional wins, they told me they “didn't want to toot their own horn," or “look like they were bragging too much." But this lack of bragging or verbal celebration holds back our careers, and our personal performance.

Entrepreneurship is a lifestyle that requires sustained, long-term high performance from every individual. The world's leading high-performance coach, Brendon Burchard, has coached over 2 million students worldwide on the 6 qualities necessary for High Performance. Celebration is not just a nice fluffy thing; it is critical for the health of a company, a vibrant culture, and must start from the top.

So many entrepreneurs run on the hamster wheel, chasing the next metric, goal, or deal, and I was one of them. I remember working in a company where a huge milestone would be met, and there was no team celebration, no recognition, and business continued as usual: grinding. Over the long term, this influences the culture of the company and the morale of all its individuals. One begins to wonder, what is the point?

Brendon Burchard encourages people to “Strive Satisfied." He says we need to integrate the wins at every step of the journey in order to avoid burnout. Just as we need a tribe with whom we can share the struggles, we also need to feel comfortable sharing the wins with each other - without feeling like we are “bragging too much."

Celebration punctuates the journey of being an entrepreneur. It infuses the labor with meaning and offers a feeling of progress, which translates to more purposeful effort.

I foster a culture of celebration within my own company, starting with myself. Each Friday, I have an event in my calendar, “Fistbump Friday", where I calculate the personal and professional wins from the week. Within my media accelerator, students are invited to #BRAG and share their wins each Friday with each other. It is amazing to see how much everyone is accomplishing and encourages us to keep moving forward!

9. How do you see the future of PR and media evolving? Thoughts on bloggers and the power that they hold?

Media platforms will continue to fragment, become more niche, and expand as individuals create their own media platforms by harnessing the power of video and social media. The techniques for storytelling evolve for emerging platforms. Power bloggers and “influencers" will begin to generate as much if not more ROI than large mainstream traditional media outlets. Many brands will become media platforms themselves to maintain a loyal audience and generate buzz that drives behavior (i.e. sales, list growth, clients, and students). Overall, brands will need to know how to tell stories with more authenticity, consistency, and stay visible in an increasingly noisy market.

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Self

It’s Time for Women to Stop Worrying About Being “Too Much”

We are living in a time when women are rising to new heights which means they are regularly being confronted with the fear of being "too much". For women in business this is pervasive and costly.

A few ways women can be perceived as "too much" are:

Speaking up about their successes and achievements.

Sharing one too many photos of their cute kids.

Telling one too many people about that date night.

Looking a little too good in that swimsuit.

These can lead to being publicly attacked on social media or privately slandered which in turn leads to women dimming their light and walking on egg shells in hopes of avoiding conflict and judgement.

The minute a woman feels it's unsafe to shine she will begin to overthink, worry, and fear how she shows up in the world.

Forgetting to announce the book is done and the interview is live.

Choosing to focus on what's still on the to-do list rather than what's been checked off.

Many female entrepreneurs are subconsciously altering their behavior in an attempt to not attract too much attention to themselves, rather than focusing on allowing authenticity and magnetism to attract their ideal clients and community.

Women are afraid of being criticized, ostracized, and abandoned by other women for simply being who they are. This leads to quite the quantum when being who you are is simplest way to accelerate the growth of your business.

New research shows men are far more comfortable with self promotion than women are. Researchers found that men rate their own performance 33 percent higher than equally performing women. What we know is that self promotion pays off and this is where women are missing the boat.

The world needs more women to step into leadership roles and no longer be intimidated about creating six and seven figure careers.

Here are five ways to release the fear of being "too much":

1. Approve of yourself.

While it feels good to receive outside validation it will never be enough if you don't first appreciate yourself. The key to having a healthy support system is to make sure you are part of it. Being your biggest critic is what your mother's generation did. It's now time to be your biggest cheerleader. Becoming aware of self talk will reveal what belief is ready to be re-wired. Create a simply mantra that affirms how incredible capable you are.

2. Connect deeply to those you serve.

One powerful way to shift out of people pleasing behavior is to get clear on who actually matters to the wellbeing and success of your life and business. Leadership is not about being the most popular, instead it's a decision to be brave for those who can't be. Take a few minutes each day to visualize and meditate on those your business serves and supports. See your future clients moving toward you every time you choose to stand in your power and use your authentic voice.

3. Remember the legacy you wish to leave.

Having your life purpose and legacy in writing is one of the most transformational exercises you can do. Reading this often will keep you focused on what matters. Knowing what you wish to leave in the hearts of those you love most is incredibly grounding. You didn't come here to keep your mouth shut, dilute your truth, or dim your light-you came here to make a difference.

4. Forgive those who have been unsupportive in the past.

The past has a way of informing the future in a negative way when there is unresolved pain. Take a few minutes to get quiet and ask yourself who you have unforgiveness towards or maybe their name came to mind as you read this article. Listening to a forgiveness meditation or writing a letter to the person you are ready to forgive are both simple and effective ways to process and heal.

5. Be part a community of bright, successful women.

Meaningful relationships with others who have similar aspirations is what will keep you out of isolation and playing small. These connections can happen in a networking group, online community or a local Meetup. Thriving in every area of life is depend on you knowing where you belong and being celebrated there. Don't wait to be invited, go actively seek out people and places that support your dreams and desires.

6. Accept you can have it all.


Women have been fed a lie for generations that says, you can have love or money. Decide you can have it all and allow it to flow to you. You can have a successful career and an amazing mother. You can balance motherhood and loving marriage. Don't let anyone write the rules for you. This is the time to create the life you desire on your terms.

7. Celebrate everything!

The fastest way to leave the haters in the dust is to celebrate everything! At the end of each day lay in bed and recall the best moments. At the end of each week, publicly acknowledge and celebrate what's good in your life. Once a month, have a celebration dinner and share it with those who have helped you in the journey. If there's something good happening, talk about it with everyone who will listen!

May you be a woman who chooses to shine so that others may be reminded of all they can be and do.