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About

US

SWAAY is a ground-breaking digital publication that harnesses the style and glamour of today’s business-minded woman. At SWAAY we believe that women’s interests are much more diverse than what traditional magazines portray. We are dedicated to celebrating the stories of established and emerging entrepreneurs to advance more women into the forefronts of innovation and entrepreneurship through visually inspiring and intellectually engaging content.


SWAAY was founded in 2016 by Iman Oubou, an entrepreneur and former Miss New York US, who noticed gender disparities in business as well as a media bias in the way the modern woman is represented. In today's world, women are starting more businesses than ever before and SWAAY's objective is to position these founders as the new icons, providing content and community for them to empower each other.

In addition to offering an editorial platform for business-minded women, SWAAY serves as an innovative example of what female-focused media should embody: intellect, influence and a powerful visual of femininity.

About

The Founder

A beauty queen, published scientist and philanthropist, SWAAY Founder, Iman Oubou is poised to change the world by challenging stereotypes.

With a diverse, multicultural and multidisciplinary background that spans a variety of fields, Iman's worldview is centered on championing innovation and changing the status quo.

Crowned Miss New York US in 2015, Iman also holds a Masters degree in biomedical engineering and a Bachelors in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. She has worked as a cancer research scientist, leading medical missions to developing countries, and is a board member of ‘Mission To Heal,” an NGO based in Washington DC.

"Throughout my life I never fit into the standard 'feminine box and I have learned that we need to define our own terms before society defines us," says Iman, who emigrated to the US from Morocco in 2006. “While there are many beautiful role models to choose from thanks to Hollywood and social media, there is a need today to spotlight and celebritize women who are making a dent through their businesses and philanthropic endeavors."

Iman launched SWAAY, as an expansion of her popular podcast 'Entrepreneurs En Vogue', in October, 2016. Her mission is to spotlight and empower female entrepreneurs who are changing the world one launch at a time.

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Our newsletter that womansplains the week
4min read
Career

Please Don't Ask Me To Network

"Who are you meeting for lunch this week?"

Without fail, my former boss would ask me this question in every weekly status we had. And I dreaded the question. Because my answer was generally a stammering "Umm… No One." Occasionally I could remember what I actually had for lunch. And almost always it was sitting in my windowless cube eating a soggy sad sandwich.


I didn't understand why "who I had lunch with this week" was worthy of being a topic on our weekly status. After all, I was only 6 months into this new job. I was still figuring out how to pull data from Nielsen. I was still figuring out how to write an innovation brief. I was still trying to figure out where the bathrooms were in this maze of a building.

And despite knowing this question would come up in every weekly status, I was reluctant to change my behavior. I didn't see the value in the question. I didn't see the importance of it in my career. I didn't understand why I had to have lunch with anyone.

Because I hated the idea of having to network, to meet people, to put myself out there. Because networking was something slimy and strange and weird and scary. It made my stomach hurt, my throat go dry. And I could feel a faint headache coming on.

Even Oxford's definition of networking only reaffirmed my fears of what networking looked like: the action or process of interacting with others to exchange information and develop professional or social contacts.

Because please don't ask me to walk into a room where I don't know anyone. And stand in the corner sipping a bad glass of Chardonnay. Please don't ask me to slide my business card out and not so subtly shove it in your face. And ask you to do something for me. Please don't ask me to network. Because I hate networking.

And I used to hate networking (okay, maybe hate is too strong.) I still really dislike the term. "Networking" seemed about getting something from someone. Or someone getting something from you. A favor, a job, a referral. "Networking" seemed very transactional. And someone shoving a business card at you (which happened to me recently at event) only solidified by feelings.

And over the years, I came to really understand that networking wasn't about "the action or process of interacting with others." It was about building authentic connections. It was about meeting people who were different than you. It was about expanding my community. And creating new communities. It was tapping into more and more communities I could belong to.

And as I slowly started to change my view on networking- I mean building authentic connections- I started to realize my communities were more inclusive than I thought. My best friends from middle school. Former bosses. College Alumni I met after we had graduated. Colleagues from past companies. Vendors and agency partners I had once worked with. Colleagues I had once managed. As my family expanded, my husband, my two sister-in laws and my brother in-law. A whole host of fabulous cousin-in-laws. My baby brother as his career skyrocketed. And fellow parents in my kids' school.

I still hate networking. And I love building connections. And helping to build connections and be a bridge for other people.

Now, when I go to a large event, I try to go with a friend. We have a drink at the bar and then part ways to try and make new friends. If we don't authentically connect with other people, and we have made the effort, we always have each other to back to.

Now, I try to meet one new person a week at my company or in my broader community, or reconnect with someone I miss seeing. (This doesn't always have to be in person, can be text, Zoom or Facetime.) And if you can't commit to doing that, that you should seriously relook at your schedule. I thank my former boss for that constant reminder.

Now, I joined Luminary, a women's collaboration hub in NYC, which has been life changing for me. I am also on the advisory board. It's all about women supporting and lifting each other up- to get more money, get that next big promotion, or start their own venture. It's a built-in community of unwavering support.

Now, I am working on expanding my community of moms. Not too long ago, I worked up the nerve to ask a fellow mom in my daughter's class if she wanted to get together. She thought I meant a playdate. I meant drinks. And after one late night out drinking, I have bonded with a whole new set of badass women.

And all of these communities. I am there for my communities. And they are all there for me. Referral for a job at my company. Coaching on how to survive a bad boss. Advice on how to ask for more money. Supporting each other as we care for aging parents. Candid feedback on why they didn't get that promotion. Commiserating over a cocktail on which working parent had the worst week ever.

So please don't ask me to network. Because I hate it. And well actually I don't have a business card to give you. I haven't printed one in four years.