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The Ultimate CBD Oil FAQ Guide - Everything You Need To Know About CBD Oil

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There is no doubt about it: Cannabis, commonly dubbed the “devil's lettuce," is going mainstream. Everywhere you look there is a new CBD self-care or beauty product on the market, and new CBD-based drugs that have been approved by the UK government to remedy common health-related disorders.


People are curious about the cannabinoid compounds present in this herb—which has been used for its therapeutic purposes for many years—and how it can benefit their health, especially when it boils down to reducing the use of over-the-counter medications and prescription drugs.

Head spinning yet? Well, consider this your complete CBD oil FAQ guide. To provide you with all the info you need about CBD oil, we rummaged around for the most-asked questions about the product.

Even better, we thoroughly researched the answers to the most-asked questions with help from the industry specialists, grouping similar questions together to help you find out everything you need to know about CBD oil.

Without further ado…

What is CBD?

CBD is short for Cannabidiol and is one of the many natural compounds present in the marijuana plant. THC is the most common of these compounds since it is the element that gets you stoned. On the flip side, CBD oil's medical benefits are unlimited, and it has no psychoactive properties.

CBD is also an essential part of the human body since we also produce our own Cannabinoids. In the simplest layman terms, CBD multiparts attach themselves to the Endocannabinoid System, which does an important job in our Homeostasis, meaning the equilibrium and balance between the different things that are continually happening inside of us.

The CBD produced by the cannabis plant mimics very well the CBD in human physiology, which is why it works so well as medication for us.

How Does CBD work?

The human body makes its own cannabis-type chemical called anandamide, commonly referred to as the pleasure molecule. CBD naturally increases the levels of your endocannabinoid, so if you take CBD in edibles or supplements, it goes into the blood, tinkling the body's countless endocannabinoid receptors.

What is the Difference Between CBD Vape-Oil & CBD Oil?

Most people think CBD vape oil and CBD oil are the same thing. Well, they're not. Before you go ahead and purchase CBD oil, and try to put it in your Electronic Cigarette, let us clarify some of the finer differences between the two products.

There are two terms we should focus on – “liquid" and “oil." CBD “oil" is usually made to be a potent product, which is to be ingested by mouth. CBD oil isn't intended to be gushed into a vape tank and smoked.

CBD e-liquids, or vape oil, are made to be vaped and inhaled as a vapor. In a nutshell, you should not vape regular CBD oil. You should be on the hunt for the correctly designed e-liquid in stock.

Can CBD get You High?

No, no, a million times, no. Which is exactly why CBD is all the buzz nowadays. CBD oil is made from the stalks, leaves, and flowers of the hemp plant that has high quantities of CBD, but little or no traces of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which is commonly found in the marijuana plant.

What are the Advantages of Using CBD Topically?

Topical CBD products are mostly used for localized pain and skin conditions. Individuals with skin diseases like acne, burns or eczema have reported remarkable results using topical CBD products.

How Much CBD Oil Should You Take?

Sadly, there is no conclusive scientific answer to this. Honestly, it calls for some trial and error to get the right amount for your condition. But, with a lot of patience and practice, you will get to that “happy point." Experts recommend taking a specific amount, twice daily for the first four days to build it up in your system and so you can truly see what it's doing. After that, decrease or increase the amount you are taking based on the results you are seeing.

Is CBD Oil Legal?

CBD oil does not have any mind-altering effects like THC. There has been a lot of confusion regarding the legality of CBD oils in the UK. Nearly all cannabinoids are mainly classified under the Misuse of Drugs Act. However, CBD oil is officially authorized, but some guidelines have been passed to control the consumption of the compound. CBD oil UK is legally accepted according to the concentration of compound used in the oil. For instance, in the UK, CBD oil shouldn't contain more than 0.2 percent of THC level in the oil.

Besides CBD, what is in CBD oil?

In addition to CBD, oils might have other cannabinoids like CBD, CBC, CBG and many more that work collectively to create what is recognized as the "entourage effect." These will all be contained in a carrier oil, which is mostly MCT oil, olive oil or hemp oil

Why is CBD Oil So Expensive?

Well, there're lots of steps and plant material needed to create the end product. Firstly, a considerable amount of hemp has to be grown, which takes months, to produce enough stalk and seeds to yield a very small amount of hemp extract. Then, the extract has to be widely tested to ensure its purity.

How Does CBD Work in Your Body?

Our bodies have cannabinoid receptors referred to as your CB2 and CB1 receptors, found all over your body. CB1 receptors are located throughout your nervous system, brain, and many other areas while CB2 receptors are linked to the cells of our immune systems.

Are CBD Products Safe?

YES. However, when selecting CBD oil, it's important to ensure that the company obtains CBD from pants that are free of pesticides, fertilizers, and herbicides. Ensure all products are tested using third-party labs and that the company you're buying from has no problem sharing their lab results.

6min read
Health

What Sexual Abuse Survivors Want You to Know

In 2016, I finally found my voice. I always thought I had one, especially as a business owner and mother of two vocal toddlers, but I had been wrong.


For more than 30 years, I had been struggling with the fear of being my true self and speaking my truth. Then the repressed memories of my childhood sexual abuse unraveled before me while raising my 3-year-old daughter, and my life has not been the same since.

Believe it or not, I am happy about that.

The journey for a survivor like me to feel even slightly comfortable sharing these words, without fear of being shamed or looked down upon, is a long and often lonely one. For all of the people out there in the shadows who are survivors of childhood sexual abuse, I dedicate this to you. You might never come out to talk about it and that's okay, but I am going to do so here and I hope that in doing so, I will open people's eyes to the long-term effects of abuse. As a survivor who is now fully conscious of her abuse, I suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and, quite frankly, it may never go away.

It took me some time to accept that and I refuse to let it stop me from thriving in life; therefore, I strive to manage it (as do many others with PTSD) through various strategies I've learned and continue to learn through personal and group therapy. Over the years, various things have triggered my repressed memories and emotions of my abuse--from going to birthday parties and attending preschool tours to the Kavanaugh hearing and most recently, the"Leaving Neverland" documentary (I did not watch the latter, but read commentary about it).

These triggers often cause panic attacks. I was angry when I read Barbara Streisand's comments about the men who accused Michael Jackson of sexually abusing them, as detailed in the documentary. She was quoted as saying, "They both married and they both have children, so it didn't kill them." She later apologized for her comments. I was frustrated when one of the senators questioning Dr. Christine Blasey Ford (during the Kavanaugh hearing) responded snidely that Dr. Ford was still able to get her Ph.D. after her alleged assault--as if to imply she must be lying because she gained success in life.We survivors are screaming to the world, "You just don't get it!" So let me explain: It takes a great amount of resilience and fortitude to walk out into society every day knowing that at any moment an image, a sound, a color, a smell, or a child crying could ignite fear in us that brings us back to that moment of abuse, causing a chemical reaction that results in a panic attack.

So yes, despite enduring and repressing those awful moments in my early life during which I didn't understand what was happening to me or why, decades later I did get married; I did become a parent; I did start a business that I continue to run today; and I am still learning to navigate this "new normal." These milestones do not erase the trauma that I experienced. Society needs to open their eyes and realize that any triumph after something as ghastly as childhood abuse should be celebrated, not looked upon as evidence that perhaps the trauma "never happened" or "wasn't that bad. "When a survivor is speaking out about what happened to them, they are asking the world to join them on their journey to heal. We need love, we need to feel safe and we need society to learn the signs of abuse and how to prevent it so that we can protect the 1 out of 10 children who are being abused by the age of 18. When I state this statistic at events or in large groups, I often have at least one person come up to me after and confide that they too are a survivor and have kept it a secret. My vehicle for speaking out was through the novella The Survivors Club, which is the inspiration behind a TV pilot that my co-creator and I are pitching as a supernatural, mind-bending TV series. Acknowledging my abuse has empowered me to speak up on behalf of innocent children who do not have a voice and the adult survivors who are silent.

Remembering has helped me further understand my young adult challenges,past risky relationships, anger issues, buried fears, and my anxieties. I am determined to thrive and not hide behind these negative things as they have molded me into the strong person I am today.Here is my advice to those who wonder how to best support survivors of sexual abuse:Ask how we need support: Many survivors have a tough exterior, which means the people around them assume they never need help--we tend to be the caregivers for our friends and families. Learning to be vulnerable was new for me, so I realized I needed a check-off list of what loved ones should ask me afterI had a panic attack.

The list had questions like: "Do you need a hug," "How are you feeling," "Do you need time alone."Be patient with our PTSD". Family and close ones tend to ask when will the PTSD go away. It isn't a cold or a disease that requires a finite amount of drugs or treatment. There's no pill to make it miraculously disappear, but therapy helps manage it and some therapies have been known to help it go away. Mental Health America has a wealth of information on PTSD that can help you and survivors understand it better. Have compassion: When I was with friends at a preschool tour to learn more about its summer camp, I almost fainted because I couldn't stop worrying about my kids being around new teenagers and staff that might watch them go the bathroom or put on their bathing suit. After the tour, my friends said,"Nubia, you don't have to put your kids in this camp. They will be happy doing other things this summer."

In that moment, I realized how lucky I was to have friends who understood what I was going through and supported me. They showed me love and compassion, which made me feel safe and not judged.