#SWAAYthenarrative

Removing The Middle-Man: How We Took Shopping Out Of The Stores And Into Your Hands

Business

I am always texting. I haven't been on Facebook since college, (crazy, I know), I don't get Twitter, and Instagram is growing on me. Yea, I sound a lot older than 31, but I'm not alone. I live in my texts. We all do. Emails are work, apps are annoying to download and I never remember to open them. But there's a reason that text messages have a 96 percent open rate - they're from my friends and family.


It pains me to say that apps are annoying because that's the world I'm coming from. I've built and run two iPhone apps and learned a lot - enough to never build one again. Don't get me wrong, building apps was a lot of fun. Building one for CollegeHumor was particularly fun. But we bent over backwards to get people to download it. Then we did backflips to get people to open it, and play it. It was an awesome experience that we had to beg people to have. You don't have to beg people to send texts.

I wanted to tether the real world, where your real friends and family actually talk, to a commerce experience. And that's why I started Shop Or Not, the weekly text message you can shop. We text you one new thing, once a week. That's it.

Your friend sees something you'd love and texts you a pic of it. We're that friend. All you have to do is text back 'Yes' and the item is shipped right to your door. That's it, pure texting - just one picture and a few sentences. No website, no app. So many times when I found myself out and about, I wouldn't buy much (yes, I hate shopping, and yes, I started a shopping company), but I would so often take pictures of things I saw that my friends would like. It is so simple, something millions of people already do every day, and best of all for someone who hates shopping, the whole experience takes about 30 seconds. We're taking you out of the store, and meeting you where you are these days.

Co-Founders, Kelly O'Malley and Kate Myers

Everything we text about is totally curated, from small batch coffee pods made in Montana to spicy chili granola made in Brooklyn to leather bags sewn in Tennessee and pocket squares made in Texas. Each product is one of a kind, made in America, we absolutely love it, and you've probably never seen anything like it before. If you only ever want to text about chocolate, great. If you only want items made in Colorado, great. Through the text conversation, we get to know you, chatting back and forth about what you like, and that way we'll be able to text you only the best stuff. If you text us any questions, like, “Is that chili granola super spicy? I'm more into sweet breakfast", then we remember that too and make sure you don't get texted anything you'll want to spit out.

Retail is evolving rapidly from the times of wandering stores and running your fingers across fabrics. Those were the days, when you only had so many choices and you could touch them all. Shop Or Not covers one of those crucial bases: fewer choices. In the area of 20-Tabs-Open-On-My-Laptop, fewer choices is a great thing. The in-store experience is limited by four walls and shelf space. Wandering around, revisiting, and discussing items with your shopping mates is a pretty lovely, cozy experience. We'd like to recreate a bit of that intimacy, while also making it so much simpler.

I believe texting, an old-fashioned technology, is the next best thing to the in-store experience, the perfect tether between the old and new ways of shopping. It's so intimate. Which means it's all about trust. It's not an ad or an app telling you what to get, it's your friend. Texting you just one thing at a time. From someone you know, who knows what you'll like, and knows that if you don't like it, you'll text back a thumbs down emoji.

Keeping it super simple is super underrated. I learned that from years of making fun but fundamentally complicated apps.

Texting is really good at some things, not so great at others. It's one way to reimagine the retail experience, but not the ultimate reinvention. For example, I would never buy a couch over text. That's something I need to look at for a while and probably put through the highly sophisticated Butt Test. Texting, however, is really good at reminding you of things, for instance. With every Shop Or Not text, you can reply 'Yes' to buy. After a while, we saw a lot of customers responding 'Gift' to be able to send the item to someone else. That gave us an idea. We texted our customers to ask, “Any special occasions coming up? Let us know your big dates this year." And we got an overwhelming response rate: people texted us back with birthdays, anniversaries, graduations, and so many special times. We scheduled texts two weeks out from every occasion to say, “Hey there, your mom's birthday is coming up, here are three gift ideas." And we watched the champagne marshmallows fly off the metaphorical shelf.

Technology moves really fast. People don't. I mean, I've run multiple tech companies and I definitely don't. Forcing apps and bots and complicated websites on people isn't what they want, it's what brands want. What people want is simply to talk to each other. Of course. So we met them there. Said hi. And texted them one awesome thing.

For SWAAY readers, text Swaay to 347-482-0881 for 25 percent off your first order.

How to Learn Much More From the Books You Read

It is one thing to read and another thing to understand what you are reading. Not only do you want to understand, but also remember what you've read. Otherwise, we can safely say that if we're not gaining anything from what we read, then it's a big waste of time.

Whatever you read, there are ways to do so in a more effective manner to help you understand better. Whether you are reading by choice, for an upcoming test, or work-related material, here are a few ways to help you improve your reading skills and retain that information.

Read with a Purpose

Never has there been a shortage of great books. So, someone recommended a great cookbook for you. You start going through it, but your mind is wandering. This doesn't mean the cookbook was an awful recommendation, but it does mean it doesn't suit nor fulfill your current needs or curiosity.

Maybe your purpose is more about launching a business. Maybe you're a busy mom and can't keep office hours, but there's something you can do from home to help bring in more money, so you want information about that. At that point, you won't benefit from a cookbook, but you could gain a lot of insight and find details here on how-to books about working from home. During this unprecedented year, millions have had to make the transition to work from home, and millions more are deciding to do that. Either way, it's not a transition that comes automatically or easily, but reading about it will inform you about what working from home entails.

Pre-Read

When you pre-read it primes your brain when it's time to go over the full text. We pre-read by going over the subheadings, for instance, the table of contents, and skimming through some pages. This is especially useful when you have formal types of academic books. Pre-reading is a sort of warm-up exercise for your brain. It prepares your brain for the rest of the information that will come about and allows your brain to be better able to pick the most essential pieces of information you need from your chosen text.

Highlight

Highlighting essential sentences or paragraphs is extremely helpful for retaining information. The problem, however, with highlighting is that we wind up highlighting way too much. This happens because we tend to highlight before we begin to understand. Before your pages become a neon of colored highlights, make sure that you only highlight what is essential to improve your understanding and not highlight the whole page.

Speed Read

You might think there have been no new ways to read, but even the ancient skill of reading comes up with innovative ways; enter speed reading. The standard slow process shouldn't affect your understanding, but it does kill your enthusiasm. The average adult goes through around 200 to 250 words per minute. A college student can read around 450 words, while a professor averages about 650 words per minute, to mention a few examples. The average speed reader can manage 1,500 words; quite a difference! Of course, the argument arises between quality and quantity. For avid readers, they want both quantity and quality, which leads us to the next point.

Quality Reading

Life is too short to expect to gain knowledge from just one type of genre. Some basic outcomes of reading are to expand your mind, perceive situations and events differently, expose yourself to other viewpoints, and more. If you only stick to one author and one type of material, you are missing out on a great opportunity to learn new things.

Having said that, if there's a book you are simply not enjoying, remember that life is also too short to continue reading it. Simply, close it, put it away and maybe give it another go later on, or give it away. There is no shame or guilt in not liking a book; even if it's from a favorite author. It's pretty much clear that you won't gain anything from a book that you don't even enjoy, let alone expect to learn something from it.

Summarize

If you're able to summarize what you have read, then you have understood. When you summarize, you are bringing up all the major points that enhance your understanding. You can easily do so chapter by chapter.

Take a good look at your life and what's going on in it. Accordingly, you'll choose the material that is much more suitable for your situation and circumstances. When you read a piece of information that you find beneficial, look for a way to apply it to your life. Knowledge for the sake of knowledge isn't all that beneficial. But the application of knowledge from a helpful book is what will help you and make your life more interesting and more meaningful.