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Mompreneurs Share Their Tips, Tricks, and Advice To Getting It All Done

Lifestyle

Being a female entrepreneur takes a lot of time, dedication and hard work. Your business becomes your baby as you birth it from idea to launch and beyond. Being a mother is even longer hours and a lifelong commitment to your family. As more and more women start and run successful businesses while having a family, they are often asked; "How the hell do they do it all?!"


We asked 10 Mompreneurs what their “secrets" are, and they openly share their advice, tips, and tricks to juggling their business babies and actual babies.

Let go of control and teach children independence

Actress and Blogger, Elisabeth Rohm, advises to "Instill confidence, positivity, and enthusiasm in the handling of their independence from you. Don't dwell on the goodbyes for too long or create drama around the fact that you're a working mother and definitely don't guilt yourself for working and being a Supermom and super role model!"

“Teaching our son from an early age how to be independent and creating routines and rituals for himself has been a gift. Since the age of 6, he has had his own diary to write his after-school activities in as well as important dates and reminders. We've always instilled in him that preparation is the key. I know he is confident to look after himself without relying on other people." Tina Bangel, Vocal Coach and Founder of One Voice School of Singing

It takes a village

“I have a lot of help around me. I have an incredible team at my restaurant who I am so proud of. They are an incredible bunch who work incredibly hard. At Super Mamas, our sister Elizabeth is our producer and who I delegate a lot to. At home, I have an incredible husband who is a true partner to me in life. So how I do it all? By asking for help, every day." Bricia Lopez, Owner of Guelaguetza Restaurant and Creator of Super Mamas

Failing to plan is planning to fail

Mona Loring, Owner and Partner at Conscious Living PR and Status PR says to "Plan ahead for as much as you can. From planning a week ahead of time to planning out everything I need to get done for the next day, I find that I'm able to get so much more done with a schedule. I will plan the night before for self-care, time with my kids on their homework and extracurricular activities while meal planning and scheduling my business meetings the week before whenever possible."

Fabienne Raphael, Online Business Consultant, Speaker and Podcaster, advises to “Prioritize and accept that some aspects have to get all my attention and some others will be neglected temporarily. It is also a great reminder to recognize which areas to delegate."

The early bird catches the worm.

Allison Carter, Creator of Confetti Party Plans and Host of the Memories in Moments Podcast, gets up an hour earlier before her kids. Waking up an hour earlier than my kids has been the biggest game-changer for my productivity. It allows me to start my day with intention, rather than immediately being on the defense with kids, needs, and the breakfast hustle. During that time, I plan my day, look at what needs to get accomplished, get social media posts finalized and ready to post, read a business book, work on my podcast, really anything! The sky is the limit in that uninterrupted, quiet hour, and it has quickly become my favorite hour of the day!"

“I've found that when I get up about an hour earlier than the kids (and spouse!), I can plan my day, workout, meditate and really set an intention for how I want the day to go. This morning routine helps me stay focused on my daily goals. When I don't get up earlier than the kids, I am way more irritable and unfocused. It completely changes my attitude and the direction of my whole day." says Renata Rebing, Healthy Food Blogger

Intention is the name of the game

Sitinee Sheffert is a mom of 5, TEDx speaker and the Founder of Giving Artfully. She says her #1 tip for mom entrepreneurs is to “Be intentional with your time and actions. As a mom, when you are with your kids, be intentional with your time with them. Don't be distracted worrying about work. Our kids will grow up so fast before our eyes, we don't want to miss this precious time because we were too distracted. As an entrepreneur, be intentional about your action steps. We are so limited by time that we must focus only on steps that will further our business."

Saying “No" to getting it all done

“For many of us moms, there's a natural impulse to do everything for everyone. The idea that being a super mom means sacrifice isn't necessarily true. One of the best things you can say to free up time and brain-space is saying no when something is out of alignment." says Kenya Moses, Founder of Be A Fit Mama, Inc., Author and Speaker.

Andi Forness, an online dating coach, says “My #1 tip raising my 2 sons as a single mom while I started and now run a successful online business, and dating, was to realize early that I was not Super Mom. The reward for not being Super Mom is that I get time for self-care and fun and my sons are growing up to be responsible little men."

While building and running a business plus making sure your family is in order are all very important, don't forget to take care of yourselves. The last piece of unanimous advice from all of these incredible women is that

"You can't get it all done and that is perfectly fine. You are still a Super Mom."
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Business

My Untold Story Of Inventing the Sports Bra And How it Changed the World (And Me)

Following are excerpts from "Unleash the Girls, The Untold Story of the Invention of the Sports Bra and How It Changed the World (And Me)" By Lisa Z. Lindahl


There is an idea that has popped up everywhere from Chaos Theory to Science Fiction and New Age memes known popularly as the "Butterfly Effect." Simply put, it is the notion that one very small thing—the movement of a butterfly's wing say, or the ripple in a lake caused by a pebble being thrown into it—can cause tremendous effect far away: the butterfly's wing a tornado, the ripple a large wave on a distant shore. Cause and effect, does it have limits? The field of physics is telling us that it takes only observation to bring a thing into being. We cannot consider these areas of investigation and not acknowledge that everything—everything—is in relationship in some way or another with everything else.

So, it is evident to me that commerce of any kind is, also, just about relationships. It all boils down, on every level to this simplicity. While we usually think of relationships as occurring between people—it is far more than that.

I used to teach a course in entrepreneurship specifically for women in The Women's Small Business Program at Trinity College in Burlington, Vermont. I made this concept of relationship and its importance central in how I taught the marketing thought process. I would stress that for a product or service to be successful, it had to meet a perceived need. There is a need, and it wants to be met; or it may be thought of as a problem to be solved. Or there may be an existing solution that is less than adequate.

For example: In my universe as a runner there already were a plethora of bras available, but they were inadequate for my purpose. The relationship between my breasts, my running body, and my bra was creating discomfort and distraction. A new solution had to be found, the relationship occurring when all these things came together had to be fixed. Utilizing this point of view, one sees a set of issues that need to be addressed—they are in relationship with each other and their environment in a way that needs to be changed, adjusted.

Nowhere is this viewpoint truer than in business, as we enter into more and more relationships with people to address all the needs of the organization. Whether designing a product or a service or communicating with others about it—we are in relationship. And meanwhile, how about maintaining a healthy relationship with ourselves? All the issues we know about stress in the workplace can boil down to an internal balancing act around our relationships: to the work itself, to those we work with, to home life, friends and lovers. So quickly those ripples can become waves.

Because Jogbra was growing so quickly, relationships were being discovered, created, ending, expanding and changing at a pace that makes my head spin to recall. And truly challenged my spirit. Not to mention how I handled dealing with my seizure disorder.

"My Lifelong Partner"

Let me tell you a bit about my old friend, Epilepsy. Having Epilepsy does not make any sort of money-making endeavor easy or reliable, yet it is my other "partner" in life. Husbands and business partners have come and gone, but Epilepsy has always been with me. It was my first experience of having a "shadow teacher."

While a child who isn't feeling she has power over her world may have a tantrum, as we grow older, most of us find other more subtle ways to express our powerfulness or powerlessness. We adapt, learn coping mechanisms, how to persuade, manipulate, or capitulate when necessary. These tools, these learned adaptations, give a sense of control. They make us feel more in charge of our destiny. As a result, our maturing self generally feels indestructible, immortal. Life is a long, golden road of futures for the young.

This was not the case for me. I learned very early on when I started having seizures that I was not fully in charge of the world, my world, specifically of my body. There are many different types of epileptic seizures. Often a person with the illness may have more than one type. That has been the case for me. I was diagnosed with Epilepsy—with a seizure type now referred to as "Absence seizures"—when I was four years old. I have seen neurologists and taken medications ever since. As often happens, the condition worsened when I entered puberty and I started having convulsions as well—what most people think of when they think of epileptic seizures. The clinical name is generalized "Tonic-clonic" seizures.

In such a seizure the entire brain is involved, rather like an electrical circuit that has gone out as a result of a power surge. I lose consciousness, my whole body becomes rigid, the muscles start jerking uncontrollably, and I fall. Tonic-clonic seizures, also known as "grand mal" seizures, may or may not be preceded by an aura, a type of perceptual disturbance, which for me can act as a warning of what is coming. The seizure usually only lasts for a few minutes, but I feel its draining effects for a day or two afterwards. Although I would prefer to sleep all day after such a physically and emotionally taxing event, I have often just gotten up off the floor and, within hours, gone back to work. It was necessary sometimes, though definitely not medically advised. I'm fond of saying that having a grand mal seizure is rather like being struck by a Mack truck and living to tell the tale.

Having Epilepsy has forced me to be dependent on others throughout my life. While we are all dependent upon others to some degree—independent, interdependent, dependent—in my case a deep level of dependency was decreed and ingrained very early on. This enforced dependency did not sit well with my native self. I bucked and rebelled. At the same time, a part of me also feared the next fall, the next post-convulsive fugue. And so I recognized, I acquiesced to the need to depend on others.

The silver lining of having Epilepsy is that it has introduced me to and taught me a bit about the nature of being powerless—and experiencing betrayal. I could not trust that my body would always operate as it should. Routinely, it suddenly quits. I experience this as betrayal by my brain and body. It results in my complete powerlessness throughout the convulsion. Not to mention an inconvenient interruption of any activities or plans I might have made.

Hence, I am the recipient of two important life lessons—and I was blessed to have this very specific and graphic experience at a young age. It made me observant and reflective, giving me the opportunity to consider what/where/who "I" was. I knew I was not "just" my body, or even my brain.

So, who or what did that leave? Who, what am I? Much has been written about trauma, and about near-death experiences, both of which seizures have been classified or described as. I won't delve into that here except to say that experiencing recurrent seizures and the attendant altered states of consciousness that sometimes accompany an episode (the euphemism for a seizure) changes one. It deeply affects you. It is both illuminating and frightening. It opens you up in some ways and can close you way down in others. For me it made it easy to consider the possibility of other ways to perceive, of other realms. And as an adult I became interested in quantum physics, where Science is pushing and challenging our long-held perceptual assumptions. Me, who was poor in math and disinterested in Science while in school! So if not merely body and brain, who am I? Spirit. And with Epilepsy's tutelage, I was encouraged to question, seek, try to understand what lies beyond.

Living with Epilepsy has also given me great strength. In realizing the futile nature of trying to have "power over" Epilepsy, I developed a deep well of "power within"—that inner strength that comes in the acceptance of that which one cannot change—and looking beyond it.

Through my experience building the business of Jogbra with the unique lens afforded me by my Epilepsy partner, I came to understand more fully the nature of power and what it means to be truly powerful.

Specifically, that having power and exercising it is not simply a manifestation of the ego. It need not be "power-tripping." It is how I wield my power that matters, making the all-important distinction between creating a situation of power over, power with, or empowering and having and creating strength in oneself and others.

Being powerful is a big responsibility.

To put all this another way: do I choose to create situations in which I am able to wield power over others? Or do I choose to empower others, sharing my strengths with them, while nurturing their strengths as well? The first is not true power. It is control. The second I believe to be the essence of true and positive power: strength. And integral to creating a more harmonious world, oh by the way.

While this may be apparent, even basic to others, it was an "aha!" moment for me. Too often in the years ahead I would give away my power and question my own strengths,. Time and again, however, my inner strength, my shadow teacher's gift, helped me survive and thrive until I could take responsibility for and embrace more fully my own power.

© Lisa Z. Lindahl 2019