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Photo Courtesy of the Birmingham Times

Janet Jackson: Advocating For Equality And Reminding Us Why She's An Icon

Culture

It's almost 9 PM on a cold fall night in Atlantic City, New Jersey. The energy is palpable as the crowd patiently waits to be reunited with their sister. 90s R&B, classic Michael Jackson, and select hits by Bruno Mars pulsate through Boardwalk Hall's sound system as the audience gyrates to the music with anticipation.


Photo Courtesy of The Fader

Then it happens. A one-minute video montage snatches everyone's attention. Racism, white supremacy, xenophobia, and domestic violence are all highlighted. The names of black men who've lost their lives due to police brutality flash across the screen. Eric Garner. Michael Brown. Philando Castille. Oscar Grant. The list goes on. This is our pertinent reminder. Although we're guaranteed a good time, there are serious matters that will be addressed.

The uniform is all black. The message is urgent. The icon is Janet Jackson. Cane in hand, she elegantly erupts onto the stage wearing a black leather trench coat and elbow length black leather gloves to match. Superhero-like, she is our leader for the next two hours. The leader of the Rhythm Nation.

Instead of jumping into “Burn It Up," the Missy assisted dance track off of her critically acclaimed latest album, Unbreakable, Janet starts the show with “The Knowledge" followed by “State Of The World," Both are socially conscious tracks off of her Rhythm Nation 1814 album. Despite these songs being almost three decades old, the issues that a then twenty-three year old Janet Jackson sought out to address are just as prevalent in 2017 as they were then.

To watch the youngest Jackson command the stage as she performs hit after hit is breathtaking. She hasn't lost a step. Alongside her troupe of dancers, who are young enough to be her children, she sings live while performing some of the most famous choreography in pop music history. All of this doesn't come easy though. Despite Jackson being one of the most well-known music artists of all time, she continues to put the work in. She began rehearsing for the State of the World tour in July, only six months after giving birth to her first child. To whip her famous body back into shape she enlisted the help of former sprinter and bodybuilder, Paulette Sybliss, who helped her lose fifty pounds. According to Sybliss, as reported in the Atlantic City Weekly, Jackson followed a strict weight-training program and increased her protein intake, while balancing her diet with carbohydrates and healthy fats to keep her energized.

Photo Courtesy of PEOPLE

But she's not doing too much. Nothing about the State of the World Tour is overstated or tries too hard. The production is not as grand as on previous tours, and the costume changes are minimal, but it all works. Jackson is at a point in her career where she doesn't need all of the theatrics.

Her herd of adoring fans love her without the extras, and she knows it. This tour and Jackson's ascend back into the spotlight is about much more than extravagant costumes and perfectly timed pyro explosions. Similar to the way that she's used her career to advocate for equal rights and the LGBTQ community (she was recently honored with the 2017 Music Icon Award at the OUT100 Gala), Jackson is using the State of the World Tour to send a very clear message – she is not okay with our current state of affairs, and her robust catalog of music will once again be used to create dialog and raise awareness about these issues.

When she performs the emotional anti-domestic violence song “What About," or the female empowerment anthems, “Nasty" and “What Have You Done For Me Lately" the crowd sings along to every word. Women testify and rejoice. This is why Jackson has stood the test of time. The fact that she is no longer the ab-baring chanteuse that she once was doesn't matter. Jackson floats across the stage, fully clothed, just as confident as she's ever been. Her million dollar smile leads the way, followed by an opulent auburn colored high ponytail that bounces to her beat.

As the show winds down you can't help but think about how special and empowering the whole thing really is. The State of the World tour is the culmination of a career that has aged gracefully. With fifty-one years under her belt and a newborn baby boy waiting backstage for her, Ms. Jackson can still outperform your favorite performer, while simultaneously using her voice for good. Now that's Control.

3 min read
Career

How You Dress is Your Calling Card: Outfits To Fit Every Industry

If you needed to hire a professional to let's say cater a dinner, head your marketing department, or perhaps act as an expert for you on a legal matter. How would you expect them to dress?

I will take a guess here and say you imagine each person with a different look, vibe, and as presenting themselves in unique ways. If their style fell short of what's perceived to be acceptable within their industry, you may even underestimate their skill set. You may question their ability to be trustworthy, confident, or knowledgeable.

You've probably already heard the phrases, "Dress for the job you want, not the job you have" or Look good, feel good." But there's a lot more to appropriate styling for the workplace than just those two outlooks alone.

We, as professionals, must ask ourselves "What should I wear?" Some may reach for a suit and tie or heels and a dress, while others simply throw on jeans and a sweater. But while the latter might be an appropriate style for certain industries, it might not be for others. It is important to understand that different markets often have a distinctive (and often unspoken) unofficial dress code.

You've probably already heard the phrases, "Dress for the job you want, not the job you have" or Look good, feel good." But there's a lot more to appropriate styling for the workplace than just those two outlooks alone. Popular job-posting source Indeed outlines that, "There are varying levels of business attire ranging from "casual" to "business formal." Based on the setting, you can decide which kind of business attire is appropriate."

However, depending on your industry, we may need to get a little more specific Let's break it down so you decide what's befitting.It is important to understand that different markets often have a distinctive (and often unspoken) unofficial dress code.

Marketing & Advertising

The era of Mad Men has passed... Long gone are the days of blue suits, skinny ties, and midday-martinis. This industry has taken a more casual but still presentable approach to dress... Think more like khakis paired with a smart blazer or sweater for or, perhaps, a dark skinny jean with wedge shoes and a silk blouse pulled together with a sweater-knit jacket.

Finance & Law

Think traditional, classic dress. Your clothes should be tailored and well-fitting. These companies usually have strict dress codes, so keep your attire to colors like black, navy, and grey. Shoes should be closed-toe (for women) and a cap-toe or lace-up loafer for the men.

Public Speaking

Here you are open to a fuller range of clothing styles. However, (and this is a big one), make sure you dress for your audience and your brand. Remember, you could be presenting in front of potential clients, and if your outfit is not cohesive to your company's ideals and identity you may leave your viewers confused.

Academia

Casual smart — very comfortable, if you're working in a lab. Think professor-type, right? Bow ties and blazers for men and dress slacks, sweaters, with low-heeled shoes for women. Limit the jewelry and long nails.

Accounting

There are casual days in this industry, usually one or two days a week. Men can wear polo shirts, collared shirts, or sweaters with khakis or dress pants, and dress shoes — a tie is not necessary. For women, conservative dresses, skirts, collared shirts, sweaters, dress pants, and dress shoes or boots are acceptable. But if you work for a more conservative company like Deloitte, you may want to refer to your employee handbook, as you may be expected to dress more professionally.

Software & Technology

Dress like you don't care but don't look sloppy. The tech industry has gotten it's distinct dressing style straight out of Silicon Valley from the likes of Zuckerberg, Dorsey, and Bezos. T-shirts, vests, jeans, and sneakers are the norm. You can find many brands to outfit your day, so it's important to select pieces of clothing that are stylish, modern with a flair… items that say "I care about how I look," though you may not care about fashion.

Style is confidence, expressed through clothing.

With all of this being said, keep in mind that you need to be cognizant of the environment. If you're unsure how to dress ask your human resources department for what is generally considered appropriate.

One last point: dress authentically. You should wear clothes that make you feel confident, clothes that represent who you are intrinsically and professionally. Power up your sleeves, take control of your future, and move forward.

Style is confidence, expressed through clothing.