#SWAAYthenarrative

SWAAY Teams Up With Former TEDx Producers To Launch A Speaker Series Curated Like A Broadway Show

Culture

Thrilling, daring ideas are thought of every day. Many hope to share these ideas, beliefs, values or passions with others. Now they can. Former TEDx Producers, Tricia Brouk and Jamie Broderick, have partnered with Iman Oubou, CEO & Founder of SWAAY, to produce Speakers Who Dare - SWAAY The Narrative, a groundbreaking speaker series curated like a Broadway show. Out of a sea of applicants, they will be featuring 20 people with big ideas from across the country.


Former TEDx Producers, Tricia Brouk and Jamie Broderick, have partnered with Iman Oubou, CEO & Founder of SWAAY, to produce "Speakers Who Dare – SWAAY The Narrative." Photo Courtesy of John DeMato.

The inaugural event will take place on March 26, 2019; standup comic, Terri Trespicio, will be hosting. “There's so much conversation that needs to be had, especially those daring conversations, so we're excited about this," Broderick exclaims. This dynamic duo combines intellect with creative content. Broderick is a visibility strategist, business-building mentor and has ignited the start and growth of many businesses. Brouk is an award-winning director and producer who help speakers bring the art of performance to talks. Together they make quite a team. They sat down with SWAAY to share their excitement and what they're looking forward to.

“We're constantly thinking about how to improve, change the narrative, make a difference in the world and give women voices as well," Brouk comments.

Their journey began during their days at TEDxLincolnSquare, where Brouk was Executive Producer and Broderick was Co-Producer. “When Jamie and I came together for the first TEDx, it was called, Risk Takers and Change Makers," Brouk begins. They swiftly answer questions, based on one another's responses. “The last two shows we did for TEDx were sold out and people just could not talk more highly about them," Broderick chimes in. “They were incredible, so we're just taking it up a few more notches from there." After retiring from TED, they decided it was the perfect transition into Speakers Who Dare. As daring women themselves, they wanted to create this theatrical academia, which Tricia has coined, with fewer restrictions than TED. “We're constantly thinking about how to improve, change the narrative, make a difference in the world and give women voices as well," Brouk comments.

Brouk and Broderick allow each other to do their part and make the show come to life. “I am a theatre producer, film maker, a creative, so I am the Executive Producer of the show and of all the talent and the casting," Brouk says. Broderick's role is completely different. “I'm great with community building, marketing, tech, visibility," she smiled. “I create the website map, create all the social media profiles, introduce the speakers to each other and help to fill the seats and put it all together." They make the big decisions without getting in one another's lane to put on a show. “We come at it from different points of view with the same goal, which is to entertain our audience, transform our speakers and build a community," Brouk clarifies.

Speakers Who Dare differs from TED Talks in many ways. Brouk and Broderick emphasize the main difference is their theatrical academia for this series, which makes it one of a kind. This time around, they have more of a creative license and is choosing to give those with daring ideas and voices a platform. “I want to be able to give speakers who are saying the things we are thinking a safe place to do that," Brouk says. Broderick picks up Brouk's answer, to share a few other benefits. “We're not restricted to showing videos during the [event][and] Tricia can put on a whole razzle-dazzle show [that will] take things up a notch," she explains. In addition to their lineup of daring speakers, they want to build a team of sponsors who dare as well. “When a sponsor comes on to Speakers Who Dare, we can promote them [and] that is something you cannot do with TED," Brouk clarifies.

The series will take place in an intimate theatre. It will not only enhance the creative space, but also make the performances intimate. “If you're a Broadway show [or] TED talk lover, you're going to [learn], be inspired by these talks and then be incredibly blown away that you get to see Broadway performers," Brouk says. Performances will take place in the morning and afternoon shows, such as Elphaba singing Defying Gravity from the musical, "Wicked". “If you buy one ticket for the whole day, you get to see all the speakers that have been selected," Brouk excitedly shares.

Though Speakers Who Dare is inclusive of men, it has a female slant. The announced speakers are listed below:

MORNING

Marc Cordon - A Revolution Of Joy

Mari Carmen Pizarro - The Impact Of The Self-Imposed Glass Ceiling

Jason Harris - The Power Of Storytelling

Dr. Kristina Hallett - Watching A Talk Happen (speaker will ask the audience for an idea)

Tracey Wik - The Influence In A Zip Code

Nydia Han - Creating Community

Rachit Kansal - We Are Abusing Our Planet

Amy O'Neill - A New Way Of Approaching Resiliency

Rocco Cozza - The Practice Of Kindness

Stephanie Simpson - Artists Can Save The World

AFTERNOON

Theresa Nguyen - Immigration: A Lack Of Access To The American Dream

Jazz Biancci - A Talk Happens (speaker will channel an idea from the audience)

Sarah Nannen - Being A Renegade Widow

Mike Shereck - Man Up

Alexis Fuentes - For The Love Of Hate

Terence A. Monahan - The Importance Of Neighborhood Policing

Tonya Harris - Discrimination And Mental Health

Marla Schultz - Being An Accidental Advocate

George Andriopoulos - Not For Profit

“We wanted to be able to marry an online storytelling platform with an in-person and alive storytelling platform," Brouk starts off. “[On] SWAAY people express themselves in the stories they're telling. Speakers Who Dare is doing the same thing."

In addition to the preview of speakers above, Brouk has also casted two more speakers for the show who will not be coming in prepared with talks. “One of them is going to ask the audience for an idea and talk right there - talk about daring!" she happily expresses. “The other one is a channeler [who is] going to sit down, read the room and then talk."

The speakers not only get to perform, but are also provided with a stylist, photographer, a copywriter, and more. They are required to come to tech rehearsals as Brouk and Broderick plan for the big day. In doing so they can receive feedback and work directly with them. SWAAY is expanding their resources as well.

Each performer also has the chance to write op-eds for SWAAY, as well. “It's about being daring, innovating, creative, [creating an] impact and legacy," Broderick says. “The [speakers] will always be part of our family and our legacy."

PARTNERSHIPS WITH SPONSORS WHO DARE

SWAAY is one of four sponsors who dare. Brouk and Broderick agree that the partnership with this publication is important. “We wanted to be able to marry an online storytelling platform with an in-person and alive storytelling platform," Brouk starts off.

“[On] SWAAY people express themselves in the stories they're telling. Speakers Who Dare is doing the same thing."

In addition to SWAAY, Binge Networks is another sponsor that will be the host of all speaker series content. “There is a Speakers Who Dare TV channel [and it's] important to me because we wanted our speakers to have a greater reach than just YouTube," Brouk says. “It's a massive platform for our speakers." Recorded talks will also be shared on Apple TV, Sony, Roku, Google Play, and more.

The end goal between this dynamic duo is to put on a great show with a great set of speakers. Right now, they are in the process of licensing their brand for upcoming events. “There is a lot of power behind women coming together, collaborating and lifting each other up," Brouk says. “That's what Jamie and I do for each other, for all the people we work with."

“It's about being daring," Broderick says.

“It's about being daring, innovative, creative, [creating an] impact and legacy," she goes on. “The [speakers] will always be part of our family and our legacy."

3 min read
Culture

Please Don't Forget to Say Thank You

"More grapes, please," my daughter asked, as she continued to color her Peppa Pig drawing at the kitchen table.

"What do you say?" I asked her, as I was about to hand her the bowl.

"More grapes?"

I shook my head.

"Please?"

I stood there.

"I want green grapes instead of red grapes?"

I shook my head again. I handed her the bowl of green grapes. "Thank you. Please don't forget to say thank you."

"Thank you, Momma!"

Here's the question at hand: Do we have to retrain our leaders to say thank you like I am training my children?

Many of us are busy training our young children on manners on the other side of the Zoom camera during this pandemic. Reminding them to say please, excuse me, I tried it and it's not my favorite, I am sorry, and thank you. And yet somehow simple manners continue to be undervalued and underappreciated in our workplaces. Because who has time to say thank you?

"Call me. This needs to be completed in the next hour."

"They didn't like the deck. Needs to be redone."

"When are you planning on sending the proposal?"

"Did you see the questions he asked? Where are the responses?"

"Needs to be done by Monday."

Let me take a look. I didn't see a please. No please. Let me re-read it again. Nope, no thank you either. Sure, I'll get to that right away. Oh yes, you're welcome.

Organizations are under enormous pressure in this pandemic. Therefore, leaders are under enormous pressure. Business models collapsing, budget cuts, layoffs, or scrapping plans… Companies are trying to pivot as quickly as possible—afraid of extinction. With employees and leaders everywhere teaching and parenting at home, taking care of elderly parents, or maybe even living alone with little social interaction, more and more of us are dealing with all forms of grief, including losing loved ones to COVID-19.

So we could argue we just don't have time to say thank you; we don't have time to express gratitude. There's too much happening in the world to be grateful for anything. We are all living day to day, the pendulum for us swinging between surviving and thriving. But if we don't have the time to be grateful now, to show gratitude and thanks as we live through one of the most cataclysmic events in recent human history, when will we ever be thankful?

If you don't think you have to say thank you; if you don't think they deserve a thank you (it's their job, it's what they get paid to do); or if you think, "Why should I say thank you, no one ever thanks me for anything?" It's time to remember that while we might be living through one of the worst recessions of our lifetimes, the market will turn again. Jobs will open up, and those who don't feel recognized or valued will be the first to go. Those who don't feel appreciated and respected will make the easy decision to work for leaders who show gratitude.

But if we don't have the time to be grateful now, to show gratitude and thanks as we live through one of the most cataclysmic events in recent human history, when will we ever be thankful?

Here's the question at hand: Do we have to retrain our leaders to say thank you like I am training my children? Remind them with flashcards? Bribe them with a cookie? Tell them how I proud I am of them when they say those two magical words?

Showing gratitude isn't that difficult. You can send a thoughtful email or a text, send a handwritten card, send something small as a gesture of thank you, or just tell them. Call them and tell them how thankful you are for them and for their contributions. Just say thank you.

A coworker recently mailed me a thank you card, saying how much she appreciated me. It was one of the nicest things anyone from work has sent me during this pandemic. It was another reminder for me of how much we underestimate the power of a thank you card.

Apparently, quarantine gratitude journals are all the rage right now. So it's great if you have a beautiful, leather-bound gratitude journal. You can write down all of the people and the things that you are thankful for in your life. Apparently, it helps you sleep better, helps you stay grounded, and makes you in general happier. Just don't forget to take a moment to stop writing in that journal, and to show thanks and gratitude to those you are working with every single day.