#SWAAYthenarrative

Why You Should Consider a Career Helping Others

Career

People look for different things in a career; some people want progression and financial rewards, whereas other people search for job roles that offer flexible working hours or remote work opportunities. Whatever you want from a career, it's important that you get satisfaction from your job and enjoy your working life. Many people agree that doing a career that helps others in some way, is a reliable way to get satisfaction from your career. Below are some of the key benefits of helping others, along with ideas of careers where you can help others.


Benefits of a career helping others

Many studies have found that helping others can be beneficial to both your physical and mental health. This is because the act of helping someone releases endorphins in your brain which creates feelings of happiness and effectively boosts your mood, all while reducing feelings of stress and anxiety. This is known as 'Helpers High'; a euphoria that happens when you do charitable deeds or selfless acts of kindness. Helping others is also an effective way to create a sense of purpose, improve your outlook on life, and become more grateful for the things you have. Studies have found that people who help others as part of their career or volunteer work, are less likely to suffer from mental health conditions such as depression, low self-esteem and anxiety disorders.

Helping others and doing good deeds can also have a significant effect on your long term physical health, as it has been shown to effectively reduce negative emotions such as stress and anxiety. This has been linked to a number of physical health benefits such as lower blood pressure and a decreased risk of heart attacks and strokes. Research has even found that helping others can increase your lifespan. According to projecthelpinghands.org, "…helping others on a regular basis can reduce early mortality rates by 22%, compared to mortality rates of people who don't participate in altruistic activities."

Careers where you can help others

Many people automatically think of the charity sector when considering careers that help others. However, there are in fact many different career choices that allow you to help others in some way. To give you some inspiration, here are some rewarding careers that help others:

Nurse

Nurses help others in a significant way. They are highly trained healthcare professionals who are responsible for treating a wide range of different illnesses and injuries. Nurses often spend a lot of time with their patients and have the unique opportunity to get to know them on a more personal level and develop close relationships. Many nurses report getting a great sense of satisfaction from helping people in their time of need, watching them make a full recovery, and playing a key role in their return to optimal health. The role of a nurse is extremely diverse and qualified nurses can choose to work in a variety of specialisms and settings. For instance, some nurses choose to attend midwifery school to become qualified midwives and support pregnant women and their babies through each stage of antenatal care.

Carer

Carers make a huge impact on the lives of others by providing valuable support which allows people to remain living independently in their homes. The role of a carer is diverse and usually involves supporting with a range of daily tasks, such as cooking and cleaning, accompanying patients on appointments, running errands and administering medication. Carers also often provide a great source of comfort and companionship and build close bonds with the person they are caring for. Most carers get a great sense of satisfaction and joy from knowing that they're making a really positive difference to someone's life. Becoming a professional carer can offer a highly rewarding and satisfying career for anyone with a naturally compassionate personality.

Police officer

Police officers help protect people by taking an active role in fighting crime and creating safer communities. They have the unique opportunity to save lives everyday and act as role models to help encourage people to make better life decisions and lead lawful lives.

The role of a police officer can be exciting and diverse, with no two days being the same. Some key responsibilities may include; responding to emergency calls, administering first aid to victims of crime, interviewing suspects, organizing investigations and giving expert testimony in court cases. To become a police officer you must have a minimum of a high school diploma or GED plus completion of the law enforcement entrance exam. Some police organizations also require or prefer applicants to have a bachelor's degree, so obtaining this is a great way to stand out from the competition and improve your career prospects.

Teacher

Teachers play an extremely important role in shaping the lives of the next generation. They are responsible for passing on their specialist skills and knowledge and educating the next generation of learners. A teacher should act as a positive role model and encourage students to achieve their best and develop the skills needed to be successful in later life. Teachers have a huge impact on their students and many people consider teaching to be a highly rewarding and fulfilling career choice for many people. Teachers also have the opportunity to work within a wide range of educational settings and teach a subject they're passionate about. To become qualified, teachers usually have to complete a bachelor's degree followed by a specialist teacher preparation program. If you're interested in this rewarding career path, you can find plenty of advice and guidance on the different routes to becoming a teacher.

Dietician

Dieticians help people lead healthier lives by providing specialist advice on nutrition and healthy eating habits. They work within a wide range of settings and many large institutions such as care homes, hospitals and schools, rely on dieticians to develop meal plans that provide high nutritional value for people with a variety of different needs. Dieticians also get to apply the skills and knowledge they acquire on themselves and benefit personally from improved health.

3 min read
Lifestyle

Help! My Friend Is a No Show

Email armchairpsychologist@swaaymedia.com to get the advice you need!

Help! My Friend Is a No Show

Dear Armchair Psychologist,

I have a friend who doesn't reply to my messages about meeting for dinner, etc. Although, last week I ran into her at a local restaurant of mine, it has always been awkward to be friends with her. Should I continue our friendship or discontinue it? We've been friends for a total four years and nothing has changed. I don't feel as comfortable with her as my other close friends, and I don't think I'll ever be able to reach that comfort zone in pure friendship.

-Sadsies

Dear Sadsies,

I am sorry to hear you've been neglected by your friend. You may already have the answer to your question, since you're evaluating the non-existing bond between yourself and your friend. However, I'll gladly affirm to you that a friendship that isn't reciprocated is not a good friendship.



I have had a similar situation with a friend whom I'd grown up with but who was also consistently a very negative person, a true Debby Downer. One day, I just had enough of her criticism and vitriol. I stopped making excuses for her and dumped her. It was a great decision and I haven't looked back. With that in mind, it could be possible that something has changed in your friend's life, but it's insignificant if she isn't responding to you. It's time to dump her and spend your energy where it's appreciated. Don't dwell on this friend. History is not enough to create a lasting bond, it only means just that—you and your friend have history—so let her be history!



- The Armchair Psychologist

Need more armchair psychologist in your life? Check out the last installment or emailarmchairpsychologist@swaaymedia.com to get some advice of your own!