#SWAAYthenarrative
BETA
Close

IT Careers after Acing the CompTIA A+ Certification Exams

Sponsored

Through the years, CompTIA continues to establish its influence in the tech industry—aiding professionals to elevate their respective careers. Among its remarkable list of certification is the vendor-neutral and highly respected A+ credential. People who are yet to gain experience in information technology will find this credential very beneficial. Valued by several international companies, a qualification this revered speaks for itself in every career hunt.


The CompTIA A+ cradles a number of entry-level tech positions that you could fit in with the help of its corresponding certification exams CompTIA A+ Certification Practice Test Questions. Detailed below are the job opportunities that the certification unlocks for you.

Computer Service Technician

If you are new to IT, the A+ credential is one of the best entry passages in various IT jobs. Although this may not be the case for every beginner who wishes to pursue an IT career, it's still a promising route that introduces you to even more career opportunities. Most people who pursue this credential proceed in dealing with PC technology. Basically, this job would require your capacity in the installation, management, configuration, upgrade, troubleshoot and repair of PCs. Through one's acquisition of the CompTIA A+ certificate, your fundamental skills and knowledge of the PC technology would be verified. This encompasses your expertise in operating systems,security, networking as well as hardware and software PrepAway Exam2: 220-1002.

IT Support Specialist

Another job you can land on with your credential is the IT Support Specialist position. This job requires you to know your way around technical aspects such as troubleshooting desktop issues, setting up a desktop or a network, and keeping technological equipment safe and smooth from any security risk. Basically, your creativity and zeal for problem-solving would be expanded more in this kind of work setup.

Each day brings an opportunity to grow your technological niche in approaching various desktop or workstation issue. You can choose to be a part of a global enterprise company or share your learning's in a humble business. Besides, being an IT Support Specialist is also a step forward in becoming an IT Help Desk Support, which is another in-demand IT career.

Technical Support

Pursuing a technical support job is also one of the tracks you can take in the field of information technology. Here, your knack in giving guidance in a customer's computer problems is bridged. You either communicate over the phone or online to provide effective resolutions related to computer issues.

System Support Administrator

A professional assigned to this job is responsible for the maintenance of user accounts as well as the company hardware and software. Part of the responsibility is how he or she should see to it that each essential part of the IT system runs as planned. If you have plans in entering this tech role, you must possess at least five years of experience, and most preferably, a college degree, as most employers look for in a candidate. You can back this credential with your A+ certification as proof of your capacity in meeting the latest trends and changes in the industry. By doing so, you show the company how adaptable you are, and most importantly, how trained you are by one of the world's most respected IT associations.

IT Consultant

This career track asks both your skills in handling IT systems and in dealing with clients. A day in the life of an IT consultant is a challenging learning process that educates him or her to bring the most reliable solutions for each client concerning technology. Besides, this type of professional must also be keen on meeting the requirements of the business and of the respective clients. This must be done through effective communication and guidance with the client along with the technical expertise.

Help Desk Technician

Sometimes, a hero can hide behind the phone or the internet. Meeting challenges that ceaselessly build one's approach in resolving issues is one thing a help desk technician faces each day. Through the guidance of a CompTIA A+, you'll be able to take hold of critical terms and concepts that will aid you in straightening out issues from different users. This can remarkably act as a significant instrument in your growth in the industry. If you leverage your credential toward this job role, you are expected to solve critical issues and handle various applications. It's a career made for the flexible and innovative individual, who always sights a solution to every technical problem.

Field Service Technician

According to Payscale.com, an average salary of such professionals is about $48,824. This is a career that highlights professional and personal elasticity. Unlike help desk technicians who resolve issues over the phone or the internet, field service technicians give solutions right directly to one assigned particular site. In this employment, professionals can either be working with a group of other repairmen or choose to function for a certain product manufacturer. This includes traveling and serving, with the goal of bringing the learning gained from hands-on training to the field.

Conclusion

The world of IT is expansive for every individual who has the skills and willingness for professional growth. Even after being certified by CompTIA A+, there's much room for improvement to a lot of professionals since education serves as a continuous process in this field.

No matter how useful the CompTIA A+ certification is, it is your personality, work ethic, and practical experience that are also instrumental. You must combine these ingredients in order to arrive at your desired career choice. Anyhow, the prize of passing the two certification exams will definitely help chart the success of your profession.

Our newsletter that womansplains the week
4min read
Influential Voices

Stop Asking if America is “Ready” for a Woman President

It's the question on everyone's tongues. It's what motivates every conversation about whether or not Liz Warren is "electable," every bit of hand-wringing that a woman just "can't win this year," and every joke about menstrual cycles and nuclear missiles. Is America ready for a woman president?


It's a question that would be laughable if it wasn't indicative of deeper problems and wielded like a weapon against our ambitions. Whether thinly-veiled misogyny or not (I'm not going to issue a blanket condemnation of everybody who's ever asked), it certainly has the same effect: to tell us "someday, but not yet." It's cold comfort when "someday" never seems to come.

What are the arguments? That a woman can't win? That the country would reject her authority? That the troops would refuse to take her orders? That congress would neuter the office? Just the other day, The New York Times ran yet another in a long series of op-eds from every major newspaper in America addressing this question. However, this one made a fascinating point, referencing yet another article on the topic in The Atlantic (examining the question during Hillary Clinton's 2016 presidential bid), which cited a study by two Yale researchers who found that people were either the same or more likely to vote for a fictional male senator when told that he was ambitious; and yet, both men and women alike were less likely to vote for a woman when told that she was ambitious, even reacting with "feelings of moral outrage" including "contempt, anger, and disgust."

The question isn't whether a woman could be president, or whether a woman can be elected president – let's not forget that Hillary Clinton won three million more votes than the wildly unqualified man currently sitting in the oval office – it's whether or not it's appropriate for a woman to run for president, in a pre-conscious, visceral, gut-check way. In short, it's about misogyny. Not your neighbors' misogyny, that oft-cited imaginary scapegoat, but yours. Ours. Mine. The misogyny we've got embedded deeply in our brains from living in a society that doesn't value women, the overcoming of which is key for our own growth, well-being, and emotional health.

Why didn't we ever ask if America was ready for Trump?

That misogyny, too, is reinforced by every question asking people to validate a woman even seeking the position. Upfront, eo ipso, before considering anything of their merit or experience or thought, whether a woman should be president, that, if given the choice between a qualified woman and an unqualified man, the man wins (which, let's not forget, is what happened four years ago). To ask the question at all is to recognize the legitimacy of the difference in opinion, that this is a question about which reasonable people might disagree. In reality, it's a question that reason doesn't factor into at all. It's an emotional question provoking an emotional response: to whom belong the levers of power? It's also one we seem eager to dodge.

"Sure, I'd vote for a woman, but I don't think my neighbor would. I'd vote for a woman, but will South Carolina? Or Nebraska? Or the Dakotas?" At worst, it's a way to sort through the cognitive dissonance the question provokes in us – it's an obviously remarkable idea, seeing as we've never had a woman president – and at best, it's sincere surrender to our lesser angels, allowing misogyny to win by default. It starts with the assumption that a woman can't be president, and therefore we shouldn't nominate one, because she can't win. It's a utilitarian argument for excluding half of the country's population from eligibility for its highest office not even by virtue of some essential deficiency, but in submission to the will of a presumed minority of voters before a single vote has ever been cast. I don't know what else to call that but misogyny by other means.

We can, and must, do better than that. We can't call a woman's viability into question solely because she's a woman. To do so isn't to "think strategically," but to give ground before the race even starts. It's to hobble a candidate. It's to make sure voters see her, first and foremost, as a gendered object instead of a potential leader. I have immense respect for the refusal of women like Hillary Clinton, Kamala Harris, Elizabeth Warren, Amy Klobuchar, and pioneers like Carol Mosley-Braun, going as far back as Victoria Woodhull, to accede to this narrative and stick to their arguments over the course of their respective campaigns, regardless of any policy differences with them. It's by women standing up and forcing the world to see us as people that we push through, not by letting them tell us where they think we belong.

One of the themes I come back to over and over again in my writing is women asserting independence from control and dignity in our lives. It's the dominant note in feminist writing going back decades, that plea for recognition not only of our political and civil rights, but our existence as moral agents as capable as any man in the same position, as deserving of respect, as deserving of being heard and taking our shot. What then do we make of the question "is America ready for a woman president?" Is America ready? Perhaps not. But perhaps "ready" isn't something that exists. Perhaps, in the truest fashion of human politics, it's impossible until it, suddenly, isn't, and thereafter seems inevitable.

I think, for example, of the powerful witness Barack Obama brought to the office of president, not simply by occupying it but by trying to be a voice speaking to America's cruel and racist history and its ongoing effects. By extension, then, I think there is very real, radical benefit to electing a chief executive who has herself been subject to patriarchal control in the way only women (and those who others identify as women) can experience.

I look at reproductive rights like abortion and birth control, and that is what I see: patriarchal control over bodies, something no single president has ever experienced. I think about wage equality; no US president has ever been penalized for their sex in their ability to provide for themselves and their families. I look at climate change, and I remember that wealth and power are inextricably bound to privilege, and that the rapacious hunger to extract value from the earth maps onto the exploitation women have been subject to for millennia.

That's the challenge of our day. We've watched, over the last decade, the radicalized right go from the fringes of ridicule to the halls of power. We've watched them spit at the truth and invent their own reality. All while some of our best leaders were told to wait their turn. Why, then, all this question of whether we're ready for something far simpler?

Why didn't we ever ask if America was ready for Trump?