#SWAAYthenarrative

3 Ways I Leverage Dynamic Digital Marketing Campaigns To Increase Sales

4min read
Business

Being an entrepreneur is certainly NOT for the faint of heart. If you bought into the social media hype, you'd believe that you can launch a program and the next day, become a millionaire. But that's not really how business works.

As a business strategist, I've been able to create a six figure business, while helping my clients do the same. However, the road has not been easy. When I first got started in the online space, it was very different than when I started my offline business in 2007. It seemed as if every person had a secret formula for what you needed to do in order to make money in your business. Before I knew it, I had invested over $75,000 in a year and a half, trying to get my business where I wanted it to be.


It was then that I realized I was trying to do too many things at once and I was not making the income (or the impact!) that I desired. So I decided to get super specific on two things first:

  1. Who I wanted to serve in my coaching business.
  2. The results/transformations

This was an absolute game changer! Then I focused on generating revenue in my business, which is how I began building dynamic digital marketing campaigns.

Now before you get lost in thinking digital marketing campaigns require you to have fourth degree Jedi tech tricks, take a breath. Digital marketing campaigns don't require you to run ads, create an eighteen part funnel (that makes you want to pull your hair out), or become the next Instagram diva. You can include any of those pieces if you want to, but dynamic digital marketing campaigns aren't about the new fancy mix of tactics that will impress your audience and peers. Dynamic digital marketing campaigns are about conversion. Period. You create what's necessary to have a profitable outcome.

There are three vital components to any dynamic digital marketing campaign.

1) have consistent leads

2) have a viable offer

3) being able to convert your leads into paying clients

Here's how I leverage dynamic digital marketing campaigns utilizing these pillars.

Create My Campaign

First, you have to create a campaign with intention. You need to know the outcome you desire, and work backwards from there. The place most business owners go wrong is by creating a campaign that's too complicated and loses sight of the end objective.

For example, if you want to sell a course and your sales process has fifteen steps in it before your prospect can buy, you've just created fifteen stopping points where they can get off the bus, never making it to Client Land.

You want to make sure that every step in the process is intentional and serves the purpose of helping your prospect in making the right decision for themselves. In order to do that, you want to map out what questions or challenges come before the big problem that your program tackles. You create your campaign out of answering those smaller questions or problems before the big problem is tackled by your program.

So when I'm sitting down to map out my campaigns, I'm asking myself these questions:

  • What are my people struggling with that they think is the actual problem?
  • What are they calling the problem (that they think they have) in their heads?
  • How do they want me to speak to them? Text, video, livestream, etc?
  • What are the big mindset breakthroughs they need to move forward with my program?

Once I have the answers to those questions, I can quickly assemble a simple campaign to take my people through, and maximize the conversions into my program.

That campaign might look like two or three livestreams into a call with me, or a couple Facebook posts with a request to message me.

Whatever you choose, it doesn't have to be complicated. The idea is to get into action so you have a process that you know you want to take your traffic and leads through.

Offers That Convert

Your offer needs to convert, especially before you build out a bunch of techy pieces (if that's the route you want to take). To test your offer conversion, first run it by your warm traffic and use organic marketing tactics, like the ones mentioned above.

You don't want to run automated traffic to an offer that you haven't sold before. First, test it on the community you've built up, and run it organically through the campaign you've mapped out. Remember, the term "digital marketing campaign" does not mean automation. It means a thoughtful journey you're taking your people through online.

Once you've got a good conversion on your offer, then you can put the automated pieces in place.

Expanding My Network Consistently

To get consistent leads, you need to expand your network constantly. I do this a few ways:

  • Speaking engagements
  • Livestreams
  • Facebook groups
  • Group coaching programs
  • Social media presence
  • Ads
  • Networking events
  • Publicity
  • And more

When you're meeting more people and making more connections, you have more eyes on your business and offers. It also helps you build powerful referral relationships.

There are more ways to expand your network, but these are great places to start. The key is to remember that if you're nurturing your relationships, you will never be hungry for leads. By creating healthy relationships and staying top of mind for your network, you'll consistently be introduced to new people, especially if you reward your referral partners in some way.

The more eyes you have on your business and the more qualified people you're moving through your sales process, the more successful your campaign will be.

I Make It Interactive

To have a truly dynamic digital marketing campaign, you need to make sure you're interacting with your audience. My favorite way to do that is through livestream and in person content. While you may not feel like getting up from behind your computer to talk to people, in person networking is a powerful way that I leverage my digital campaigns, because I can build referral and joint venture partnerships. That means the people who I meet are excited to take my offers and put my digital marketing campaigns right in front of their audience.

If you're not ready for the in person leap, that's okay. Livestreaming and other online mediums will work for building connection. The more interactive your communication medium is, the more emotional investment your leads will put into it.

Here are some questions you can ask yourself to make sure you're building the interaction piece into your dynamic digital marketing campaign (pssst...this is the part that makes it dynamic).

  • Is there a clear and easy way for my leads to ask questions and get answers? (E.G. livestream comments and chat bots)
  • Is there a clear and easy way for my leads to see that I'm speaking directly to them? (E.G. livestreams, videos, webinars, email—all while communicating in a way that they understand)
  • Is there a clear and easy way for my leads to share information with me, even if I'm not interacting in real time? (E.G. can they send me an email, write to me in a group or community of some kind, etc.)

The interaction you have with your audience builds trust. So you want to balance giving them the proper structure to interact with you, which builds that relationship (and closes the sale) faster, without being omnipresent. Your leads need to understand that access to you is a premium that they need to invest in, so it's important not to be glued to the interaction 24/7. Build out your interaction structure and stick to it.

I Show Them The Real Problem

When you're marketing, it's easy to tell your leads all of the things that are actually wrong with how they're seeing or approaching their problem, because for you, it's so clear what their real problem is. And believe me, I get it. I have facepalmed more times than I can count when someone tells me what they think their problem is, when it's so clear that it's actually something else, which is why none of the solutions they've been trying have worked.

However, you can't just blurt out the actual problem to your people because most of the time, they won't be in a space to hear it. You have to show them instead. Here's how you work that into your digital marketing campaign.

Take them through the sequence of their day or situation. Reflect back to them the things they're going through, and get them to confirm what you're saying. Once you've got that confirmation, you've begun to get their emotional buy-in because they see you clearly understand them.

Continue the conversation by naming things they've tried and reflecting back to them how they've struggled with the progress. Get them to confirm again. When you get them nodding and confirming what you're saying, then you can show them where the real problem is because you've earned their trust.

Before you tell them what the real problem is, show them a case study or example of someone else who was just like them, and reveal what that case study's real problem was. This will help them stay open to the ideas you're sharing, which will make them more open to seeing what the real challenge is.

Once you've got their agreement on where the real problem is and you've got their emotional buy-in, now you've set yourself up for a well converting dynamic digital marketing campaign.

4 Min Read
Business

Today, Companies Need to Retain Veteran Employees in Order to Survive and Thrive

In 2020, as the world turned on its axis, we all held on for dear life. Businesses, non-profits, government organizations, and entrepreneurs all braced for a new normal, not sure what it would mean, what would come next, or if we should be excited or terrified.

At the same time that everything is shifting, being put on hold, or expanding, companies have to evaluate current talent needs, empower their teams to work from home, discover new ways to care for clients from a distance, and navigate new levels of uncertainty in this unfamiliar environment. Through it all, civilians are being encouraged to lean into concepts like "resilience" and "courage" and "commitment," sometimes for the first time.

Let's contrast what the business community is going through this year with the common experience of the military. During basic training, officer candidate school, multiple deployments, combat, and reintegration, veterans become well-versed in resilience, courage, and commitment to survive and thrive in completing their mission. Today, veterans working in the civilian sector find the uncertainty, chaos, instability, and fear threading through companies eerily familiar.

These individuals do not leave their passion and sense of service behind when they separate or retire out of the military. Instead, typically veterans continue to find avenues to serve — in their teams, their companies, their communities.

More than ever before, today's employers who employ prior military should focus on why and how to retain them and leverage their talents, experience, and character traits to help lead the company — and the employees — to the other side of uncertainty.

What makes veterans valuable employees

Informed employers recognize that someone with a military background brings certain high-value assets into the civilian sector. Notably, veterans were taught, trained, and grounded in certain principles that make them uniquely valuable to their employers, particularly given the current business environment, including:

Leadership

It's been said that the United States Armed Forces is the greatest leadership institution in the world. The practices, beliefs, values, and dedication of those who serve make them tested leaders even outside of the military. Given the opportunity to lead, a veteran will step forward and assume the role. Asked to respect and support leadership, they comply with that position as well. Leadership is in the veteran's blood and for a company that seeks employees with the confidence and commitment to lead if called upon, a veteran is the ideal choice.

Commitment

The hope is that all employees are committed to their job and give 100% each day. For someone in the military, this is non-negotiable. The success of the mission, and the lives of everyone around them, depend on their commitment to stay the course and perform their job as trained. When the veteran employee takes on a project, it will be completed. When the veteran employee says there's an unsurmountable obstacle, it is so (not an excuse). When a veteran says they're "all in" on an initiative, they will see it through.

Strategy, planning, and improv

Every mission involves strategy, planning, and then improvisation from multiple individuals. On the battlefield, no plan works perfectly, and the service member's ability to flex, pivot, and adapt makes them valuable later, in the civilian sector. Imagine living in countries where you don't speak the language, working alongside troops who come from places you can't find on a map, and having to communicate what needs to get done to ensure everyone's safety. Veterans learned how to set goals, problem-solve challenges, and successfully get results.

Service

With an all-volunteer military for decades now, every man and woman who wore our nation's uniform raised their hand to do so. They chose to serve their country, their fellow Americans, and their leaders. These individuals do not leave their passion and sense of service behind when they separate or retire out of the military. Instead, typically veterans continue to find avenues to serve — in their teams, their companies, their communities.

When companies seek out leaders who will commit to a bigger mission, can think strategically and creatively, and will serve others, they look to veterans.

Best practices in retention of veteran talent

Retention starts at hiring. The experience set out in the interview stage provides insight about how it will be to work and grow within the team at the company. For employers hiring veterans, this is a critical step.

Veterans often tell me that they "look to work for a company that has a set of values I can ascribe to." The topic of values can serve as an opportunity for companies seeking to retain military talent.

The veteran employee may have had a few — or several — jobs since leaving the military. Or this may be their first civilian work experience. In any case, setting expectations and being clear about goals is vital. Remember, veterans are trained to complete a mission and a goal. When an employer clarifies the mission and shows how the veteran employee's role supports and fulfills that mission, the employee can more confidently and successfully complete their work.

Additionally, regular check-ins are helpful with veteran employees. These employees may not be as comfortable asking for help or revealing their weaknesses. When the employer checks in regularly, and shows genuine interest in their happiness, sense of productivity, and overall job satisfaction, the veteran employee learns to be more comfortable asking for help when needed.

The military is a values-driven culture. Service members are instilled with values of loyalty, integrity, service, duty, and honor, to name a few. When they transition out of the military, veterans still seek a commitment to values in their employers. Veterans often tell me that they "look to work for a company that has a set of values I can ascribe to." The topic of values can serve as an opportunity for companies seeking to retain military talent. Make it clear what your values are, how you live and act on those values, and how the veteran's job will promote and support those values. Even work that is less glamorous can be attractive to a veteran if they understand the greater purpose and mission.

Today, veterans working in the civilian sector find the uncertainty, chaos, instability, and fear threading through companies eerily familiar.

Finally, leveraging the strengths and goals of any employee is critical, and particularly so with veterans. If you have an employee who is passionate about service, show them ways to give back — through mentoring, community engagement, volunteerism, etc. If your veteran continues to seek leadership roles, find opportunities for them to contribute at higher levels, even informally. When your veteran employee offers to reframe the team's mission to gain better alignment across the sector, give them some runway to experiment. You have a workforce that is trained and passionate about and skilled in adapting and overcoming. Let them do what they do best.