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How These Teenage Sisters Reinvented Makeup For The Millennial Minimalist

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Ally and Taylor Frankel's brand Nudestix has taken the beauty market to task in the past year with its minimalist beauty aesthetic and easy application. The indie sensation has become a hit with the millennial generation rising up against make-up heavy faces and SWAAY talked to Taylor about leading the way forward with their minimalist movement.


“We do not aspire to look perfect and flawless - we just want to look like ourselves - but also, we just want something quick and easy, and to embrace our natural beauty"

The girls' mom left her high profile job back in 2011 so she could devote more time to her children's upbringing - an Eat, Pray, Love moment Taylor calls it, and with that she had more time to spend watching the girls, listening and observing their habits. Before long, the girls and their morning routine would come to resemble a family business opportunity the likes of which the billion dollar cosmetics industry has never seen.

In an era of youtubers and make-up tutorials, the girls made a break from the discerningly heavy and obvious make-up trends of old and saw a white space in the market for a more minimal, toned down look. Instead of trying to emulate beauty bloggers and celebrities, Ally and Taylor encourage you to look like yourself. And they're now attributed to one of the biggest trends of late - the stick and its multi-form, multi-use, hassle-free application.

The girls "multitasking lives" demanded a product that merely accentuated their best features rather than sculpting their entire face. There simply wasn't the time anymore for something extraneous. They aren't #MUAs nor do they profess to be; they're the everygirl, working to produce a line for girls like them to use quickly and efficiently everyday - and the stick form does this. Neutral shades are the girls go to and the sticks can thus become multipurpose - for your eye, lip and cheek.

"We're not make-up artists"

"The beauty industry talks a lot about perfection, flawlessness and make up artistry, 'full face' - and it totally turned us off"

Enter Nudestix - the make up brand for the millennial minimalist.

Sisters Ally(17) and Taylor(20) represent a youthful ignorance toward the by-gone age of Sex in the City whereby their mother and her peers would lather on make up and pour over their imperfections for superfluous amounts of time with brushes and creams before deeming themselves ready for the day ahead. Their Nudestix campaign 'Go Nude but Luminous' attests to a generation who care about their appearance but refuse to spend the amount of hours previous generations have spent layering on le macquiallage. "It was about enhancing what we already had" says Taylor. Having become a bit peeved at how the cosmetic industry was talking to women - instructing them on the heavy amounts of make-up it's deemed necessary to wear in our airbrushed world - the girls and their mother decided a neutral and minimalist approach was the future. “Even though there were all these beauty products out there," Taylor remonstrates, “they weren't talking to us about beauty the way we wanted to be talked to."

Their mother, Jenny Frankel, was mixer and make-up extraordinaire(the woman who brought you M.A.C's lipglass) before taking time off from her prolific career in cosmetics to focus on her daughters' upbringing - “our mom has been in the beauty industry for twenty years," Taylor laughs, “she co-created her own beauty brand while my sister and I were both in diapers." And so the story goes that when the girls grew up and start acquiring their own sense of style and makeup routines, Jenny recognized the difference in her daughters' routine versus her own, and saw an opening in the market for the busy millennials, and thereafter, Nudestix was found.

The girls and their mother have worked tirelessly to produce products that represent a new age of Make-up and a new trend that has very quickly caught on. It has become a niche in a market that almost demands superfluity - purple eyeshadows; sculpted faces; burlesque lips. "We like to think about make-up in a way a lot of people aren't talking about it," Taylor posits - "which is, you don't need to wear a full face. You can wear a little bit in strategic places to accentuate your features."

"We're your everyday girls - we're students, we're working"

Having rose quickly to fame because of their appearance on QVC, where they were allowed the run of the show - from curating to producing, you can now find the product pretty much everywhere - most notably on the shelves in Sephora. The brand 'for millennials, by millennials' is seriously hot stuff and was included in my round-up email last week from the make-up retailer. The girls have certainly started a trend, with many other makeup lines now adding multi-use pencils to their product lists.

"It's a trend now which is awesome," Taylor recognizes in her competition, "but for us, it was really about creating a product that was multi-use." The simplification of the beauty process and the accentuation of natural beauty having been their aim from the beginning its only natural that the brand has become such a success. We recently got to try the matte lip pencil and the highlighter, and as busy women constantly running around the city - these pencils are the very best product for the woman with little to no time. If these teens don't scream aspirational goals - I don't know who does.

"We want people to be able to say - these girls, they're your girls next door, if they can do it, so can we"

2 Min Read
Business

How I Built My Business From The Side Of My Daughter's Hospital Bed

It all started when I began documenting my daughter's 436-day hospital stay on Instagram.

She was a perfectly healthy 3-year-old and out of nowhere had a ruptured appendix made worse by a failed immune system. Sepsis began to consume her body and talking about it on social media was my way to cope with the fear of the unknown.

The doctors saved her life that night in January of 2018, but it was touch and go for a while until the doctors decided she was ready for a bone marrow transplant.

By then my daughter Theresa and our family had gained attention locally and nationally because of the rarity of her disorder. It doesn't even have a name. People would comment day and night on my Instagram posts wanting updates about how she was doing and wanting to see her on video.

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436+ days in the hospital with Theresa taught me how to prepare to be productive during shelter in place . When you really couldn't go anywhere often while in the hospital . Not like there was anywhere TO GO... just waiting day in and day out for answers that took a long while . Didn't want to venture out much because didn't want to get Theresa sick . It feels VERY similar to now. Little within your control no matter how much you'd panic and worry . You realize you can see this as an opportunity for growth or an opportunity to let fear and worry consume you . . Let me give you my best advice on how to tackle shelter in place, from someone who gets it all too well . . 1️⃣ Develop your new routine: some may say to keep your normal routine but chances are we've gotta adapt things, like training schedules and coaching calls to fit with the fact the kiddos are home 😅 . 2️⃣ Fill your cup first: get an iced latte, take a walk, take a nap, whatever you gotta go to feel your best before you pour into working on your new project or content . 3️⃣ communicate: talk to your spouse and kiddos and ask for their support in your balancing life, family and work. Ask what they need from you right now and share how they can best support you . 4️⃣ Create as much as you consume: it's easy to get sucked into scrolling and the next thing you know the sun has set ☀️ set a timer ⏱ to step away from your tiktok for you page (just me? 😂😂) to write an email or post to your IG feed . 5️⃣ dont try to do it all alone: it's a crazy time and your feelings are valid. You don't have to navigate this by yourself. Ask for help, reach out... you know I always have your back❤️. . . Comment below: what are you up to this weekend?
A post shared by Kayla - LAUNCHING EXPERT (@kaylaybanez) on Mar 21, 2020 at 4:04pm PDT

It was in the Fall of 2018 when people started to ask me how I was doing certain things on Instagram. I didn't realize how good I had become at utilizing hashtags, posting easily digestible content and building up a loyal community around my daughter's journey to health.

I realized that the months I spent learning everything I could about using Instagram the way I had been, gave me skills that small businesses and online personal brands would pay for. For the longest time this was a way to make myself feel normal (because living in the hospital for over a year isn't normal) and now, people were ready to pay me. It was a surreal experience.

I started by offering one time consultations and the more demand increased, the more I realized that I had a very specific niche in mind. I wanted to help online business owners use Instagram to make genuine business connections without spamming or "cold messaging" them.

I made it my personal brand to "stop the 'hey girl' messaging movement," which is essentially the unfortunate standard of small business owners randomly messaging anyone they cross paths with online and asking them if they want to purchase their products.

Especially while we were in the hospital I would receive dozens of spam messages a day from people trying to sell me their products without even taking a moment to look at my page to see what my family has been going through let alone learn my name. That's where the "hey girl" comes from, because they couldn't even be bothered to look at the name on my page.

I called out these sleazy business tactics because I believe social media is meant for true relationship building and connection.

My message took off! My personal brand has become instantly recognizable because I am speaking out about things business owners feel but have been afraid to talk about because nobody else was talking about it — as a result, my business boomed!

I went from focusing on working with people 1:1 into working with more group coaching. This allowed me to scale my business to the point of making over $300,000 in revenue since I started in the fall of 2018, all from a system and strategy I created while in my daughter's hospital room.