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BETA

Global Beauty: What's Trending In Aesthetic Medicine? With Dr. Rahi

5 Min Read
Culture

I recently traveled to Paris to attend the International Master Course on Aging Science (IMCAS) and met with some incredible doctors from around the world to learn the latest trends in aesthetic medicine— the field of improving cosmetic appearance through medical procedures. My practice in Los Angeles serves a truly diverse and international clientele, and these conferences are a great way for me bring the latest global procedures and products back home for my patients.


Here are my three biggest global beauty takeaways from the trip! Face threads are an increasingly popular procedure to quickly and efficiently rejuvenate your look, and they can be easily tailored to your needs. The V-shape jawline contour is big in South Korea, if you're looking for something more transformative. Whereas women in Paris are embracing the art of aging naturally while still looking flawless with the help of minimally invasive threads.

Another big trend in global beauty is the process of utilizing radiofrequency therapy to heat the skin in order to reduce lines and loose skin. This incredibly advanced technology is now being used all over the body, especially on the face and vagina.

Finally, this may not be a specific global beauty trend, but the gender dynamics of beauty are majorly shifting in terms of both providers and patients. More women are entering aesthetics as providers and more men are utilizing aesthetics as patients. Italy has a quickly growing population of male patients, and in Brazil the gender breakdown is already 50/50!

Those were my major global beauty lessons from this trip, but I also spoke with several doctors directly about how their practices are shifting with the times. Here are some of the amazing doctors from all over the globe that I had the pleasure of meeting with in Paris, as well the latest products and therapies they recommend! The world of beauty is shifting, and we're going right to the source.

Dr. Rahi with Dr. Bernard Peyronnet

Dr. Bernard Peyronnet is a dermatologic surgeon whose patients include French celebrities and international royalty. He's based in the heart of Paris, working out of a gorgeous office that doubles as his home. Dr. Peyronnet revolutionized aesthetics by introducing the noninvasive chemical peel. He also loves adding subtle threads to a woman's face or body to create natural-looking improvements in contour, texture, or lift. French women never want to look like they've had work done. He calls his method the "French touch," which results in flawless results that keep everyone guessing.

As you can see, there have been some truly amazing global beauty advances in the field of aesthetic medicine, with doctors around the world continuing to innovate and refine their offerings. My time in Paris was so informative and inspiring, and I cannot wait to pass some of that knowledge on to my patients (and you!). If you would like to learn more about how the newest trends in aesthetics can help you achieve your desired look, please contact my office at doctorrahi.com to book a consultation!

3 Min Read
Lifestyle

Help! Am I A Fraud?

The Armchair Psychologist has all the answers you need!


Help! I Might Get Fired!

Dear Armchair Psychologist,

What's the best way to be prepared for a layoff? Because of the crisis, I am worried that my company is going to let me go soon, what can I do to be prepared? Is now a good time to send resumes? Should I save money? Redesign my website? Be proactive at work? Make myself non-disposable?

- Restless & Jobless

Dear Restless & Jobless,

I'm sorry that you're feeling anxious about your employment status. There are many people like yourself in this pandemic who are navigating an uncertain future, many have already lost their jobs. In my experience as a former professional recruiter for almost a decade, I always told my candidates the importance of periodically being passively on the market. This way, you'd know your worth, and you'd be able to track the market rates that may have changed over time, and sometimes even your job title which might have evolved unbeknownst to you.

This is a great time to reach out to your network, update your online professional presence (LinkedIn etc.), and send resumes. Though I'm not a fan of sending a resume blindly into a large database. Rather, talk to friends or email acquaintances and have them directly introduce you to someone who knows someone at a list of companies and people you have already researched. It's called "working closest to the dollar."

Here's a useful article with some great COVID-times employment tips; it suggests to "post ideas, articles, and other content that will attract and engage your target audience—specifically recruiters." If you're able to, try to steer away from focusing too much on the possibility of getting fired, instead spend your energy being the best you can be at work, and also actively being on the job market. Schedule as many video calls as you can, there's nothing like good ol' face-to-face meetings to get yourself on someone's radar. If your worries get the best of you, I recommend you schedule time with a qualified therapist. When you're ready, lean into that video chat and werk!

- The Armchair Psychologist

HELP! AM I A FRAUD?

Dear Armchair Psychologist,

I'm an independent consultant in NYC. I just filed for unemployment, but I feel a little guilty collecting because a) I'm not looking for a job (there are none anyway) and b) the company that will pay just happens to be the one that had me file a W2 last year; I've done other 1099 work since then.

- Guilt-Ridden

Dear Name,

I'm sorry that you're wracked with guilt. It's admirable that your conscience is making you re-evaluate whether you are entitled to "burden the system" so to speak as a state's unemployment funds can run low. Shame researchers, like Dr. Brené Brown, believe that the difference between shame and guilt is that shame is often rooted in the self/self-worth and is often destructive whereas guilt is based on one's behavior and compels us to do better. "I believe that guilt is adaptive and helpful – it's holding something we've done or failed to do up against our values and feeling psychological discomfort."

Your guilt sounds like a healthy problem. Many people feel guilty about collecting unemployment benefits because of how they were raised and the assumption that it's akin to "seeking charity." You're entitled to your unemployment benefits, and it was paid into a fund for you by your employer with your own blood, sweat, and tears. Also, you aren't committing an illegal act. The benefits are there to relieve you in times when circumstances prevent you from having a job. Each state may vary, but the NY State Department of Labor requires that you are actively job searching. The Cares Act which was passed in March 2020 also may provide some relief. I recommend that you collect the relief you need but to be sure that you meet the criteria by actively searching for a job just in case anyone will hire you.

- The Armchair Psychologist