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Breaking Traditions: This Woman Is The First To Run Her Family's Italian Winery

People

Cristina Chiomenti lives a life that sounds like the perfect movie plot—New York City lawyer who moved to Tuscany to run her family's century-old winery. But following in the footsteps of a family history brimming with so much success and history isn't all glamorous.


With her roots planted in both Italy and New York City, Chiomenti began her career as a lawyer in New York City—at the very same firm founded by her grandfather. Today, she practices law in Tuscany while operating Fattoria del Teso, the 50-hectare Vineyard her great-grandparents bought over 100 years ago. Taking over the family business is not without its share of learning curves and obstacles to overcome. Here, Chiomenti describes in her own words, why she chose this path and what being the first woman to run the family business has taught her—and can teach you too . . .

“I'm a fourth-generation lawyer. My great grandfather (Filippo Vassalli, 1885 –1955) is considered in Italy the founder of modern civil law, having drafted in 1942 the Italian Civil Code. This was a monumental task as it required mastering ancient Roman empire laws and modern laws such as the Code Napoléon issued by Napoleon in France in 1804 and the Bürgerliches Gesetzbuch published in Germany in 1900. Whilst fully absorbed by his profession, my great grandfather Filippo was always reminiscent of his origins from Tuscany and never lost contact with his beloved land. Finally, in the 1930s – after a long search – he bought a 50 hectares farm called “Fattoria del Teso." It lays at the feet of Montecarlo a village (borgo) ideally located one mile above sea level, 40 miles west of Florence and 30 miles east of the beautiful coast of Tuscany (Viareggio, Forte dei Marmi).

"Montecarlo position has always kept an important place in history. The land surrounding it is devoted to the cultivation of high-quality olive oil and wines."

Montecarlo position has always kept an important place in history. The land surrounding it is devoted to the cultivation of high-quality olive oil and wines (Montecarlo Rosso and White, both produced with a certified process and with Denominazione Origine Controllata). In the 14thcenturies armies from Pisa, Lucca and Florence contended this territory through bloody battles. The very name of the city Montecarlo is a tribute to Charles IV of Luxembourg who had a decisive role in a battle against Lucca. Following the purchase of Fattoria del Teso by my great-grandfather in 1930, the history of my family and the history of Fattoria del Teso intertwined inextricably for generations to this day. My great-grandfather loved the farm and the land per se and took every opportunity to travel from Rome to Tuscany to enjoy the fantastic hills and scenery surrounding the Fattoria del Teso.

In 1979, my grandfather Pasquale initiated the production of wine and built the structure where the cellar is now located. As a founder of one of the top international law firms in Italy, Chiomenti Studio Legale, he meticulously designed every detail of the winery. From vineyards, to grapes to the selection of the ancient barrels to be put in the cellar (the barrels used for the production of Vinsanto came from a scotch whiskey distillery and are still in use). I would say that to this day, Fattoria del Teso and its products reflect the drive of my grandfather: a very modern man with a bright business vision whose achievements speak for themselves. After the Second World War in 1948, he founded an associated law firm inspired by the big Anglo-Saxon international law firms. This firm is today one of the biggest firms in Italy, with offices in London, Bruxelles, New York and China. It's the firm where I work today—in New York Cty we have an office in Rockefeller Center and it's probably the biggest Italian law firm in the United States. Our firm works in close collaboration with the most important American law firms, assisting US clients in their investments in Italy and Italian clients in their business activities in the US.

After the passing of my grandfather, my father took over the law firm and the farm, preserving and continuing the tradition of “Law and Montecarlo" initiated half a century before by Filippo.

"As a founder of one of the top international law firms in Italy, Chiomenti Studio Legale, he meticulously designed every detail of the winery."

Today, I have the privilege and honor to continue such a tradition and follow in the steps of my family.

I graduated in law school and focused on building my career as an international business lawyer within the international firm that bears my family name. I spent several years in New York City where I graduated from NYU in 2005 in International Legal Studies. At the same time, Montecarlo has always been a fundamental part of my life and the most important memories of my life have its beautiful hills and scenario as background. When I was a kid, I played between the numerous trees in the farm, learning to drive the bicycle between the vineyards and spending hours laying in the grass looking to the sky. During my teens, I spent hours studying on the porch and walking through the fields.

My grandfather was my first mentor. Although he died in 1990 I have a lot of memories about him. His devotion and passion in handling the firm. His courage in being one of the first Italian lawyers studying abroad (he also studied in the United States). The way he loved Fattoria del Teso and the way he was proud of every single vineyard he planted and barrel he bought. It is definitely very important to find mentors during life. Stories of personal and business success are fundamental examples to follow. Today, like my great-grandfather in the 30's, I travel to Montecarlo from Rome whenever possible and it is my favorite place to spend holidays and vacations. I decided to put all my energies and focus on the Fattoria del Teso and the Montecarlo wine. Even though law still fascinates me, I feel that my destiny is in the farm. I apply to farming the same values of quality of service and pursuit of excellence that I put in the law is my mission.

My family instilled in me the same work ethic and values which allowed my predecessors to establish themselves as leaders in their respective fields.

My grandfather Pasquale managed to establish an international law firm in the difficult post-WWII years. He has been and still is a model for the generations of lawyers who continue to practice in the firm that still carries his name. Entrepreneurship, vision, and dedication are values that my family taught me and that I still apply to Montecarlo.

I moved back to Italy in 2008, after four years in New York City. Like my great grandfather Filippo, I never severed my ties with Italy and Montecarlo and feel that my place in the world is closer to my land. I'm the first woman in the family practicing law and managing the Fattoria. Both activities present challenges which – in my opinion – are bigger compared to my male peers. Gender equality is slowly getting the attention of the public in Italy but, nevertheless, numbers show a lower number of women in leading positions. I take particular pride in proving that I'm up to the task and capable of keeping up with three generations of great, brilliant male lawyers and farm owners. And, I 'm most protective of our tradition which is to only make wine using our grapes, use our traditional bottles and labels and keep our cellar as it was at the time of my grandfather—with the obvious innovations necessary to keep the products up to date. I'm protective of the land and of the ancient Villa built in 1800. Keeping vineyards, meadows, trees, and structure in order requires constant care and love. Our ancient cellar can host about 120 people for wine tastings and meals and it's my job to constantly increase the number of tourists coming to visit us from all over the world.

There's no greater satisfaction than having success and overcoming many obstacles and - sometimes - some prejudice, in a context that is not predominantly female. Those around us see these results and understand them and appreciate even more. I believe in the absolute need to be able to relate to everyone and in the infinite school of knowing how to get the best out of people. These are goals that I set myself every day. My models of leaders, in the family and outside, are the line with these values and then I inspire myself."

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Health

Patriarchy Stress Disorder is A Real Thing and this Psychologist Is Helping Women Overcome It

For decades, women have been unknowingly suffering from PSD and intergenerational trauma, but now Dr. Valerie Rein wants women to reclaim their power through mind, body and healing tools.


As women, no matter how many accomplishments we have or how successful we look on the outside, we all occasionally hear that nagging internal voice telling us to do more. We criticize ourselves more than anyone else and then throw ourselves into the never-ending cycle of self-care, all in effort to save ourselves from crashing into this invisible internal wall. According to psychologist, entrepreneur and author, Dr. Valerie Rein, these feelings are not your fault and there is nothing wrong with you— but chances are you definitely suffering from Patriarchy Stress Disorder.


Patriarchy Stress Disorder (PSD) is defined as the collective inherited trauma of oppression that forms an invisible inner barrier to women's happiness and fulfillment. The term was coined by Rein who discovered a missing link between trauma and the effects that patriarchal power structures have had on certain groups of people all throughout history up until the present day. Her life experience, in addition to research, have led Rein to develop a deeper understanding of the ways in which men and women are experiencing symptoms of trauma and stress that have been genetically passed down from previously oppressed generations.

What makes the discovery of this disorder significant is that it provides women with an answer to the stresses and trauma we feel but cannot explain or overcome. After being admitted to the ER with stroke-like symptoms one afternoon, when Rein noticed the left side of her body and face going numb, she was baffled to learn from her doctors that the results of her tests revealed that her stroke-like symptoms were caused by stress. Rein was then left to figure out what exactly she did for her clients in order for them to be able to step into the fullness of themselves that she was unable to do for herself. "What started seeping through the tears was the realization that I checked all the boxes that society told me I needed to feel happy and fulfilled, but I didn't feel happy or fulfilled and I didn't feel unhappy either. I didn't feel much of anything at all, not even stress," she stated.

Photo Courtesy of Dr. Valerie Rein

This raised the question for Rein as to what sort of hidden traumas women are suppressing without having any awareness of its presence. In her evaluation of her healing methodology, Rein realized that she was using mind, body and trauma healing tools with her clients because, while they had never experienced a traumatic event, they were showing the tell-tale symptoms of trauma which are described as a disconnect from parts of ourselves, body and emotions. In addition to her personal evaluation, research at the time had revealed that traumatic experiences are, in fact, passed down genetically throughout generations. This was Rein's lightbulb moment. The answer to a very real problem that she, and all women, have been experiencing is intergenerational trauma as a result of oppression formed under the patriarchy.

Although Rein's discovery would undoubtably change the way women experience and understand stress, it was crucial that she first broaden the definition of trauma not with the intention of catering to PSD, but to better identify the ways in which trauma presents itself in the current generation. When studying psychology from the books and diagnostic manuals written exclusively by white men, trauma was narrowly defined as a life-threatening experience. By that definition, not many people fit the bill despite showing trauma-like symptoms such as disconnections from parts of their body, emotions and self-expression. However, as the field of psychology has expanded, more voices have been joining the conversations and expanding the definition of trauma based on their lived experience. "I have broadened the definition to say that any experience that makes us feel unsafe psychically or emotionally can be traumatic," stated Rein. By redefining trauma, people across the gender spectrum are able to find validation in their experiences and begin their journey to healing these traumas not just for ourselves, but for future generations.

While PSD is not experienced by one particular gender, as women who have been one of the most historically disadvantaged and oppressed groups, we have inherited survival instructions that express themselves differently for different women. For some women, this means their nervous systems freeze when faced with something that has been historically dangerous for women such as stepping into their power, speaking out, being visible or making a lot of money. Then there are women who go into fight or flight mode. Although they are able to stand in the spotlight, they pay a high price for it when their nervous system begins to work in a constant state of hyper vigilance in order to keep them safe. These women often find themselves having trouble with anxiety, intimacy, sleeping or relaxing without a glass of wine or a pill. Because of this, adrenaline fatigue has become an epidemic among high achieving women that is resulting in heightened levels of stress and anxiety.

"For the first time, it makes sense that we are not broken or making this up, and we have gained this understanding by looking through the lens of a shared trauma. All of these things have been either forbidden or impossible for women. A woman's power has always been a punishable offense throughout history," stated Rein.

Although the idea of having a disorder may be scary to some and even potentially contribute to a victim mentality, Rein wants people to be empowered by PSD and to see it as a diagnosis meant to validate your experience by giving it a name, making it real and giving you a means to heal yourself. "There are still experiences in our lives that are triggering PSD and the more layers we heal, the more power we claim, the more resilience we have and more ability we have in staying plugged into our power and happiness. These triggers affect us less and less the more we heal," emphasized Rein. While the task of breaking intergenerational transmission of trauma seems intimidating, the author has flipped the negative approach to the healing journey from a game of survival to the game of how good can it get.

In her new book, Patriarchy Stress Disorder: The Invisible Barrier to Women's Happiness and Fulfillment, Rein details an easy system for healing that includes the necessary tools she has sourced over 20 years on her healing exploration with the pioneers of mind, body and trauma resolution. Her 5-step system serves to help "Jailbreakers" escape the inner prison of PSD and other hidden trauma through the process of Waking Up in Prison, Meeting the Prison Guards, Turning the Prison Guards into Body Guards, Digging the Tunnel to Freedom and Savoring Freedom. Readers can also find free tools on Rein's website to help aid in their healing journey and exploration.

"I think of the book coming out as the birth of a movement. Healing is not women against men– it's women, men and people across the gender spectrum, coming together in a shared understanding that we all have trauma and we can all heal."

https://www.drvalerie.com/