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Women Are More Intuitive Than Men, But Are We Really?

4min read
Lifestyle

Women's intuition is a thing. We hear it time and time again, that women have a keener sense of our gut feelings and that women are more intuitive than men, but are we really?


While science will show that both genders possess the same amount of ability to tap into their subconscious, therefore receive gut feelings, intuitive messages and perceptions, perhaps it's simply that women are more likely to learn about or more trusting to follow certain impulses and guttural hits. We know we are more likely to discuss this important aspect of our survival, openly. But as of late, we must rewrite that script because mental health, hypnosis, meditation and mind science is on the rise. And men are beginning to not only join in the conversation but to lead the charge. Mind health started with alarming us to Autism moving into sirens sounding around Alzheimers, now the bells and whistles of AI and the new-mind frontier have all joined in the cacophony.

We've become good at virtually everything and as more and more information travels the superhighway, let's look at our subconscious basics (for more details check out Subconscious Power: Use Your Inner Mind to Create the Life You've Always Wanted) before our neural networks get tangled and our synapses slow down.

1) Information keeps you safe

Your subconscious mind gathers information and stores information at record speed. Why? For your successful survival. This information is quickly translated as good for me or not good for me. Your survival is the number one priority of your subconscious. Thoughts like did I leave the oven on; or did I close the garage door? Is this person telling me the truth? Am I being warned of something looming in the future? All of these hits or gut instincts keep you safe so the more sensitive you become to the whisper or tap on the shoulder, the better. Chances are, you've heard the saying 'stranger danger'. Let your subconscious assist you in knowing who is safe and who is not.

2) Evolution for learning

You might have very strong impulses to take a certain job or connect with a certain mate and you follow through with your gut. You commit to this person, place or thing and then with time, you find it doesn't work out. Can a subconscious intuitive hit be wrong? No, not really and here's why. We are evolutionary creatures and learn by engaging in experiences. Like any gamer knows, you must pass one level to continue to the next and life lessons are no exception in the game of life. Going with your gut and not getting the outcome you expected is not failure, rather evolution's way of teaching us our lessons. This goes back to the saying 'you don't always get what you want, you get what you need'.

3) More is better

Like any muscle group, the more you use your subconscious, the stronger it gets. The reverse is true, too. An atrophied intuition is nothing to be proud of because being in sync with your inner GPS means you're listening to your most valued asset, your subconscious power. Any time you follow your gut instinct and it works out for you, is called a convincer. This convincer literally convinces you to do it again and again for each success then ultimately many successful outcomes. These outcomes then build confidence toward the next and the next outcome until one day you look back on your life as both successful and happy. Isn't that what we are all looking for?

When you agree to follow your intuition you agree to a plan, a blueprint that was set in motion long before your conscious mind came on board. You agree to connect, listen and follow this divine source of knowledge for your progression and your journey. For this we are grateful! And in gratitude, we appreciate and honor that which makes us special. We honor our intuitive guide and enjoy the insights and richness of spirit our subconscious gives us.

Our newsletter that womansplains the week
5min read
Culture

Does Victoria Have The Secret to Gender Equality in The Workplace?

Victoria's Secret is best known for what it has to offer women. However, a few days ago as I was strolling around the flagship store on Bond Street, I discovered that the store also has a lot to offer men as well. Just not exactly what you'd think.


My experience began like many other shopping excursions, casually browsing for a few practical items. The store was bustling with women who were relaxed but focused on their own purchases. The women in the store all displayed a quiet confidence in knowing what to do and how to do it. My browsing journey took me into another room where I noticed a man behaving quite awkwardly while being guided around by one of the many well-trained twenty-something shop assistants. My first thought was: "Good for him coming in here alone! I imagine it isn't the most comfortable experience for a man." It was clear he felt out of place. His discomfort was obvious by the way he was shuffling around and avoiding eye contact with any women nearby.

This otherwise unremarkable experience sent a spark through my mind. This man was professional and smartly dressed; perhaps he could have worked for one of the many private equity, hedge fund or banking firms in the nearby area. I imagined that he was confident in his own world of work, but in this female haven he was not. He was the only man in the room, and it showed.

This world - that of Victoria's Secret - was not created to make someone like him feel comfortable. In this environment—a store catering to women, filled by women and selling feminine merchandise—the familiar patriarchal dynamics of the world had completely shifted.

This was a world that can transform an otherwise confident professional into an introverted, self-conscious and indecisive man who needed the help of a twenty-something female to make one simple purchase.

I have seen this story play out with the gender roles reversed many times throughout my career in the corporate world. Today, the culture of many companies are built and sustained by men, for men. Traditional male characteristics are still encouraged, rewarded and expected from female professionals, especially if they expect to reach the executive suite. Being the only woman in the room is still an everyday reality for so many women in business; most men do not understand how corrosive this situation can be to a person's confidence.

I have often heard men say that they believe gender inequality is not an issue in their firm. They hire women and now even have some women on their teams. Well, on those terms this man should not have experienced any issue either. There is no sign at the door of Victoria's Secret barring men from entry. Men are allowed to freely enter and buy whatever they choose. No woman in there would tell them to leave or suggest that to get to the front of the queue they must behave in a certain way. So, what was the problem? Why did this man appear so uncomfortable? Why did he suddenly lack the confidence he seemed to have in the outside world?

It's all in the numbers. If that store catered towards the needs of men, or if there were simply more men in the store (either equivalent to or greater than the number of women), then it is likely that man would have felt a greater sense of belonging.

Just because women are allowed into the workplace now, does not mean their experiences are equivalent to those of their male peers. Women, as the minority, simply do not have the same sense of freedom to be their true authentic selves in many corporate environments, even today.

Just like that Victoria's Secret shop assistant guiding the lone man through an ostensibly unwelcoming environment, so, too, do women benefit from the guidance of sponsors, helping them navigate the male dominated corporate world.

Before a man talks about gender parity, perhaps he first needs to take a trip to a lingerie store and experience what it is like to be the only one in the room. Maybe if more men had experiences like this, they may begin to understand what it is to feel so out of place. Maybe they would join us in creating greater gender equality in the workplace.