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Uptown -vs- Downtown: NYC Experts Tell Us How To Handle Our Hair This Holiday Season

Culture

As we descend into the latter end of December, everything revolves around our holiday parties and what we'll wear or how we'll style. With the cold weather drying our hair out and making it more difficult to maintain, we inevitably look to professionals for tips on how best to conduct our locks this party season. For fun, we spoke with one stylist each from high-end New York salons who work on either end of the city, in order to gain an uptown -vs- downtown perspective.


As a "Color Icon," Beth Minardi is a fierce advocate for women, having left corporate America to become a pioneering force in the beauty business. Currently, in residence at The Samuel Shriqui Salon on NYC's Upper East Side, she was eager to share with us her essential tricks for the perfect holiday do. We also chatted with Joanna Trumino of Arrojo’s Soho location. Trumino graduated from Arrojo Cosmetology School and has worked at Arrojo for two and a half years. Given this, she has a comprehensive understanding of the modern creative philosophy behind the salon, and gave us the low down on her favorite style hacks, products, and seasonal colors.

One of our most pressing issues this time of year is what do we do when our hair dries out from the winter cold? We asked both style experts for their advice on what do for these chilly months. “I use a deep conditioner like Arrojo Whipped Treatment a couple of times a week,“ Trumino tells us. Minardi says her ‘can’t live without product’ for this time of year is her Minardi fortifying pre-wash therapy, a crème oil that keeps hair silky and shiny between salon visits. “Especially helpful over the Holidays as more parties mean more blowouts, and that leads to dry, brittle hair unless it's properly nourished.”

Both women agree that the Holidays are the time to go big and bold. “I tell my clients Holiday is not the time to go low-key, says Minardi. “Don't step it down, step it up. Be bold! Move out of your safety zone. Re-energize your look; it’s time to make a statement that turns heads. What will capture attention at Holiday parties will be brilliant, illuminated shades. Blondes will have shimmering strands of snow white or ivory intermingled with pale walnut. Reds will be dramatic, strong copper tones, even hints of crimson. Brunettes will be glamorous, shades of cappuccino or café au lait will glow around the face.”

“I also try not to wash my hair constantly. Your hair needs those natural oils to keep your hair moisturized and healthy. Washing often creates excess dryness,” says Trumino.

Getting ready on the go is tough, especially when you have that last minute holiday party. We asked the downtown resident stylist for advice on how to get ready last minute. “Curling iron or wand is always your best bet," says Trumino. "You don't even need to blow dry your hair first. A rough dry and some curls thrown in from the iron could make for a sexy, bedhead look with a purpose. To do, rough, dry hair, using hands to toss around the hair, which will help create natural texture and volume. Next, use Arrojo Protective Thickening Lotion to shield from heat damage while giving light hold and great shine. Now curl the face frame, sides and back in opposite directions with a curling wand (curling wands are easier to use than curling irons as they are clip-less, which makes them easier to maneuver); curling in opposite directions will give you your most natural-looking, shapely curl. To finish with sexy oomph, once hair is curled, spritz in some ReFINISH dry shampoo to add an instant boost of texture and volume.”

Joanna Trumino

Beth Minardi

The color expert, Minardi, has a few suggestions on go-to looks for all the holiday parties. “Our feelings about color evolve as the Holidays approach. Clothing and makeup tones signal that something new is in the air. Since hair color has become the makeup we never take off, there is always the opportunity to keep re-inventing, so I am always about finding ways to have color stay exciting, flattering and party-ready for the festive season. There is no one look that is right for everyone.” The professional advises us. “I guide my clients in maintaining both a color level and a tone that is the best fit for them. Part of my work centers around creating that perfect shade that accents an individual’s own personal palette: Skin depth and tone, eye color and natural hair color and texture, as well as personality, all provide signals that I use to keep my color clients ‘color perfect’."

“I honestly love a classic, big-haired, voluptuous blowout. Go big, or go home!” - Joanna Trumino.

Wondering what to do with your hair for the New Year? Trumino told us her perfect look for the ball drop. “Blowout! Up-dos are beautiful, but blowouts are less work for the client to worry about falling apart throughout the night.” The uptown stylist gave us the inside scoop on how to style your hair for 2018. “Take charge of your look for the new year,” Minardi says. “Be a bolder, more dynamic version of yourself; it’s time rev up the glamour quotient, don’t stick with the same old, same old. It’s your chance, to make a fresh start, to get in the game in an exciting new way. Jump start your life with a bold new look and fresh new direction in how you present yourself.”

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Health

Patriarchy Stress Disorder is A Real Thing and this Psychologist Is Helping Women Overcome It

For decades, women have been unknowingly suffering from PSD and intergenerational trauma, but now Dr. Valerie Rein wants women to reclaim their power through mind, body and healing tools.


As women, no matter how many accomplishments we have or how successful we look on the outside, we all occasionally hear that nagging internal voice telling us to do more. We criticize ourselves more than anyone else and then throw ourselves into the never-ending cycle of self-care, all in effort to save ourselves from crashing into this invisible internal wall. According to psychologist, entrepreneur and author, Dr. Valerie Rein, these feelings are not your fault and there is nothing wrong with you— but chances are you definitely suffering from Patriarchy Stress Disorder.


Patriarchy Stress Disorder (PSD) is defined as the collective inherited trauma of oppression that forms an invisible inner barrier to women's happiness and fulfillment. The term was coined by Rein who discovered a missing link between trauma and the effects that patriarchal power structures have had on certain groups of people all throughout history up until the present day. Her life experience, in addition to research, have led Rein to develop a deeper understanding of the ways in which men and women are experiencing symptoms of trauma and stress that have been genetically passed down from previously oppressed generations.

What makes the discovery of this disorder significant is that it provides women with an answer to the stresses and trauma we feel but cannot explain or overcome. After being admitted to the ER with stroke-like symptoms one afternoon, when Rein noticed the left side of her body and face going numb, she was baffled to learn from her doctors that the results of her tests revealed that her stroke-like symptoms were caused by stress. Rein was then left to figure out what exactly she did for her clients in order for them to be able to step into the fullness of themselves that she was unable to do for herself. "What started seeping through the tears was the realization that I checked all the boxes that society told me I needed to feel happy and fulfilled, but I didn't feel happy or fulfilled and I didn't feel unhappy either. I didn't feel much of anything at all, not even stress," she stated.

Photo Courtesy of Dr. Valerie Rein

This raised the question for Rein as to what sort of hidden traumas women are suppressing without having any awareness of its presence. In her evaluation of her healing methodology, Rein realized that she was using mind, body and trauma healing tools with her clients because, while they had never experienced a traumatic event, they were showing the tell-tale symptoms of trauma which are described as a disconnect from parts of ourselves, body and emotions. In addition to her personal evaluation, research at the time had revealed that traumatic experiences are, in fact, passed down genetically throughout generations. This was Rein's lightbulb moment. The answer to a very real problem that she, and all women, have been experiencing is intergenerational trauma as a result of oppression formed under the patriarchy.

Although Rein's discovery would undoubtably change the way women experience and understand stress, it was crucial that she first broaden the definition of trauma not with the intention of catering to PSD, but to better identify the ways in which trauma presents itself in the current generation. When studying psychology from the books and diagnostic manuals written exclusively by white men, trauma was narrowly defined as a life-threatening experience. By that definition, not many people fit the bill despite showing trauma-like symptoms such as disconnections from parts of their body, emotions and self-expression. However, as the field of psychology has expanded, more voices have been joining the conversations and expanding the definition of trauma based on their lived experience. "I have broadened the definition to say that any experience that makes us feel unsafe psychically or emotionally can be traumatic," stated Rein. By redefining trauma, people across the gender spectrum are able to find validation in their experiences and begin their journey to healing these traumas not just for ourselves, but for future generations.

While PSD is not experienced by one particular gender, as women who have been one of the most historically disadvantaged and oppressed groups, we have inherited survival instructions that express themselves differently for different women. For some women, this means their nervous systems freeze when faced with something that has been historically dangerous for women such as stepping into their power, speaking out, being visible or making a lot of money. Then there are women who go into fight or flight mode. Although they are able to stand in the spotlight, they pay a high price for it when their nervous system begins to work in a constant state of hyper vigilance in order to keep them safe. These women often find themselves having trouble with anxiety, intimacy, sleeping or relaxing without a glass of wine or a pill. Because of this, adrenaline fatigue has become an epidemic among high achieving women that is resulting in heightened levels of stress and anxiety.

"For the first time, it makes sense that we are not broken or making this up, and we have gained this understanding by looking through the lens of a shared trauma. All of these things have been either forbidden or impossible for women. A woman's power has always been a punishable offense throughout history," stated Rein.

Although the idea of having a disorder may be scary to some and even potentially contribute to a victim mentality, Rein wants people to be empowered by PSD and to see it as a diagnosis meant to validate your experience by giving it a name, making it real and giving you a means to heal yourself. "There are still experiences in our lives that are triggering PSD and the more layers we heal, the more power we claim, the more resilience we have and more ability we have in staying plugged into our power and happiness. These triggers affect us less and less the more we heal," emphasized Rein. While the task of breaking intergenerational transmission of trauma seems intimidating, the author has flipped the negative approach to the healing journey from a game of survival to the game of how good can it get.

In her new book, Patriarchy Stress Disorder: The Invisible Barrier to Women's Happiness and Fulfillment, Rein details an easy system for healing that includes the necessary tools she has sourced over 20 years on her healing exploration with the pioneers of mind, body and trauma resolution. Her 5-step system serves to help "Jailbreakers" escape the inner prison of PSD and other hidden trauma through the process of Waking Up in Prison, Meeting the Prison Guards, Turning the Prison Guards into Body Guards, Digging the Tunnel to Freedom and Savoring Freedom. Readers can also find free tools on Rein's website to help aid in their healing journey and exploration.

"I think of the book coming out as the birth of a movement. Healing is not women against men– it's women, men and people across the gender spectrum, coming together in a shared understanding that we all have trauma and we can all heal."

https://www.drvalerie.com/