#SWAAYthenarrative
BETA
Close

How I Turned A Diet Into A Successful Company

Lifestyle

As a woman, being bombarded by media-driven body ideals becomes all too familiar. New rumors, fad diets and false information find their ways into our ears and onto our computer screens every day. That’s why when I heard about the ketogenic diet I was skeptical but instantly curious. Afterall, who would believe you can lose weight eating all the bacon and butter you want? It’s not exactly that simple, but not that far from the truth either! How did the ketogenic diet lead me down the path of becoming a work-from-home, avid traveler and entrepreneur so quickly anyway?


A short background on the ketogenic diet is in order. The ketogenic diet was first discovered as a weight loss tool when patients with epilepsy who were following the diet ended up losing weight quite efficiently. The keto diet was tested against the traditionally “healthy” low-fat diet, and it was discovered to be more effective for weight loss 1-6. It involves limiting your carb intake and getting most of your energy through fat and protein. In fact, only about 5 percent of your daily calories would be coming from carbs. The standard American diet (SAD, as it is so appropriately abbreviated) usually consists of about 300 grams of carbs or more per day; the keto diet, only 25-50 grams daily.

Keto’s benefits branch beyond those of just weight loss. It’s been shown to reduce risk and reverse Type 2 Diabetes, heart diseases, stroke, Alzheimer’s, epilepsy, and more7-13. Losing weight doesn’t necessarily mean you’re healthy, we all know that. Restricting your calories to nearly nothing just to see those numbers on the scale decrease is a dangerous way for women and girls to eat. The keto diet stresses enjoying real food. None of that low-fat, chemically-laden garbage. I’m talking about organic meat (red and white), fish and eggs, full-fat dairy and cheeses, nuts, real, low carb vegetables, etc. and in high quantities! We don’t limit calories; we limit certain types of calories.

Photo Courtesy of Live Love Fruit

My research and self-experimentation using the ketogenic diet as an aid started in 2014. I saw results almost immediately, not only in my weight but my mood, hair, skin, nails, appetite, cravings, energy, sleep, you name it! The PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome) I had been battling with cleared up nicely too. Goodbye, raging hormones! The keto diet got me into the kitchen cooking my own meals more and got my creative juices flowing. Making food wasn’t challenging per se, but to continue enjoying the food I so loved (like chocolate desserts) I had to make some changes and learn to incorporate new ingredients into the mix.

I no longer had (or have) any of the following in my kitchen/pantry: pasta, potatoes, bread, cereal, rice and any grains, beans, flour, sugar, honey, candy, basically anything in the dessert category. Before you run for the hills, I can tell you I eat better than ever and made it my business to show people how to do it themselves. There are ways of recreating all your favorite foods, especially desserts, using low carb ingredients and pairing them with keto-friendly foods to help you lose weight and feel all-around healthier and happier.

To help people start feeling this way, I started Tasteaholics.com, with my partner, Rami Abramov in 2015 and now find ourselves full-time bloggers and entrepreneurs in the health and diet industry. Tasteaholics has grown to be one of the leading resources for low carb and ketogenic diet information and recipes, and we did it all from our own home and for just a $12 investment. We quit our day jobs a long time ago and never looked back.

Food blogs are popular, to say the least. The low carb niche is gaining popularity, and it feels like we got in at a very opportune time. We started from humble beginnings: with a domain name, a simple theme and lots of content to be written. From diet basics to “how-to” guides and recipes, we wrote up anything and everything we knew about the keto diet. After our website was full of information, it was time to start networking and meeting the peers in our industry. We offered recipes for their sites, help with social media shoutouts and even starting creating recipes and videos for a few sites. Slowly, we grew our brand and made keto our day jobs.

Today, a typical day in the life of a Tasteaholic starts with lots of correspondence and maintenance. I answer blog comments, emails and social media replies every day - it’s usually my morning warm-up! I move on to working on the several blog posts I have in the works at any time.

It’s important for me to be able to take a break from one project and move on to the next, if only for a few minutes. It keeps things fresh and moving!

Photo Courtesy of Dr. Mike Diet

Beyond imagining and testing new, low carb recipes, I’m also managing the company’s entire social media presence, ebook and physical cookbook productions, and video shooting and editing. All these things, of course, done from home!

That’s not to say we have to stay at home. As long as our laptops are fully charged, we can do our jobs from anywhere in the world. And we have! Last year, we lived abroad in 8 different countries in 6 months, working and exploring all at the same time. We got busy in our Airbnb kitchens in-between touring new cities and seeing the world with our own eyes. I’m happy to report our business is still afloat, even though we weren’t “in the office” in 6 months.

Tasteaholics is now a successful company pulling in more revenue than I ever would have seen with that Speech Sciences degree of mine laying around somewhere. It seems like an ever-changing environment that’s so fun to keep up with. We’ve got projects in the works in all directions. Cookbooks, both digital and physical, a free Android app that’s soon to be available for iOS, and an Amazon store where we’re starting to sell our own line of low carb products!

After years of tolerating a college major I cared nothing about and trudging along in a dead-end job, what I’ve learned from Tasteaholics was that passion stirs everything! Without it, work feels like just that: work. It’s cliche to say, but I never feel like what I do is work, because I enjoy it so much. I found a way to turn my passion for health, cooking and photography into something I can grow and learn from. Tasteaholics can help people begin their journey into wellness and improve their lives and I’m thankful to have had the opportunity to be a part of it.

Our newsletter that womansplains the week

Choosing the Right Corporate Structure: Which Business Entity Should You Go With?

Business entities can be defined as the corporate, tax and legal structures which an organization chooses to officially follow at the time of its official registration with the state authorities. In total, there are fifteen different types of business entities, which would be the following.


  • Sole Proprietorship
  • General Partnership
  • Limited Partnership or LP
  • Limited Liability Partnership or LLP
  • Limited Liability Limited Partnership or LLLP
  • Limited Liability Company or LLC
  • Professional LLC
  • Professional Corporation
  • B-Corporation
  • C-Corporation
  • S-Corporation
  • Nonprofit Organization
  • Estate
  • Cooperative Organization
  • Municipality

As estates, municipalities and nonprofits do not concern the main topic here, the following discussions will exclude the three.

Importance of the State: The Same Corporate Structure Will Vary from State to State

All organizations must register themselves as entities at the state level in United States, so the rules and regulations governing them differ quite a bit, based on the state in question.

What this means is that a Texas LLC for example will not operate under the same rules and regulations as an LLC registered in New York. Also, an LLC in Texas can have the same name as another company that is registered in a different state, but it's not advisable given how difficult it could become in the future while filing for patents.

To know more about such quirks and step-by-step instructions on how to start an LLC in Texas, visit howtostartanllc.com, and you could get started with the online process immediately. The information and services on the website are not just limited to Texas LLC organizations either, but they have a dedicated page for guiding fresh entrepreneurs through the corporate tax structures in every state.

Sole Proprietorship: Default for Freelancers and Consultants

There is only one owner or head in a sole proprietorship, and that's what makes it ideal for one-man businesses that deal with freelance work and consulting services. Single man sole proprietorships are automatic in nature, therefore, registration with the state is unnecessary.

Sole proprietorships are also suited to a degree for singular teams such as a small construction crew, a group of handymen, or even miniature establishments in retail. Also, this puts the owner's personal financial status at jeopardy.

Due to the fact that a sole proprietorship entity puts all responsibilities for paying taxes and returning loans, it directly jeopardizes the sole proprietor's personal belongings in case of a lawsuit, or even after a failed loan repayment.

This is the main reason why even the most miniature establishments find LLCs to be a better option, but this is not the only reason either. Sole proprietors also find it hard to start their business credit or even get significant business loans.

General Partnership: Equal Responsibilities

The only significant difference between a General Partnership and a Sole Proprietorship is the fact that two or more owners share responsibilities and liabilities equally in a General Partnership, as opposed to there being only one responsible and liable party in the latter. Other than that, they more or less share the same pros and cons.

Registration with the state is not necessary in most cases, and although it still puts the finances of the business owners at risk here, the partnership divides the liability, making it a slightly better option than sole proprietorship for small teams of skilled workers or even small restaurants and such.

Limited Partnership: Active and Investing Partners

A Limited Partnership (LP) has to be registered with a state and whether it has just two or more partners, there are two different types of partners in all LP establishments.

The active partner or the general partner is the one who is responsible and liable for operating the business in its entirety. The silent or investing partner, on the other hand, is the one who invests funds or other resources into the organization. The latter has very limited liability or control over the company's operations.

It's a perfect way for investors to put their money into a sector that they are personally not experienced with, but have access to people who do. From the perspective of the general partners, they have similar responsibilities and liabilities to those in a general partnership.

It's the default strategy for startups to find funding and as long as the idea is sound, it has made way for multiple successful entrepreneurial ventures in the recent past. However, personal liability still looms as a dangerous prospect for the active partners to consider.

Limited Liability Company and Professional LLC

Small businesses have no better entity structure to follow than the LLC, given that it takes multiple good ideas from various corporate structures, virtually eliminating most cons that are inherent to them. Any and all small businesses that are in a position to or are in requirement of signing up with their respective state, usually choose an LLC entity because of the following reasons:

  • It removes the dangerous aspect of personal liability if the business falls in debt or is sued for reparations
  • The state offers the choice of choosing between corporation and partnership tax slabs
  • The limited legalities and paperwork make it suited for small businesses

While more expensive than a general partnership or a sole proprietorship, a professional LLC is going to be a much safer choice for freelancers and consultants, especially if it involves risk of any kind. This makes it ideal for even single man businesses such a physician's practice or the consultancy services of an accountant.

B, C and S-Corporation

By definition, all corporation entities share most of the same attributes and as the term suggests, they're more suited for larger or at least medium sized businesses in any sector. The differences between the three are vast once you delve into the tax structures which govern each entity.

However, the basic differences can be observed by simply taking a look at each of their definitive descriptions, as stated below.

C-Corporation – This is the default corporate entity for large or medium-large businesses, complete with a board of directors, a CEO/CEOs, other executive officers and shareholders.

The shareholders or owners are not liable for debts or legal dispute settlements in a C-Corporation, and they may qualify for lower tax slabs than is possible in any other corporate structure. On becoming big enough, they also have the option to become a publicly traded company, which is ideal for generating growth investments.

B- Corporation – the same rules apply as a C-Corporation, but due to their registered and certified commitment to social and environmental standards maintenance, B-Corporations will have a more lenient tax structure to deal with.

S-Corporation – Almost identical to a C-Corporation, the difference is in scale, as S-Corporations are only meant for small businesses, general partnerships and even sole proprietors. The main difference here is that due to the creation of a pass-through entity, aka a S-Corporation, the owner/owners do not have liability for business debt and legal disputes. They also are not taxed on the corporate slab.

Cooperative: Limited Application

A cooperation structure in most cases is a voluntary partnership of limited responsibilities that binds people in mutual interest - it is an inefficient structure due to the voluntary nature of its legal bindings, which often makes it unsuitable for traditional business operations. Nevertheless, the limited liability clause exempts all members of a cooperative from having personal liability for paying debts and settling claims.

This should clear up most of the confusion surrounding the core concepts and their suitability. In case you are wondering why the Professional Corporation structure wasn't mentioned, then that's because it has very limited applications. Meant for self-employed, skilled professionals or small organizations founded by them, they have less appeal now in comparison to an LLC or an S-Corporation.