#SWAAYthenarrative

Why Sexism Remains A Major Barrier For Women In Tech

Culture

Every year since 1998, tech billionaires, wantrepreneurs and mega-corporations converge in Las Vegas to discuss all aspects of tech from beauty to virtual reality at the annual Consumer Electronic Show.


This year Nina Garcia, the Editor in Chief of Elle Magazine, moderated one of only two panels focused on women called "Global Dialogue of Connection and Support." The guests were Glory Cheung, chief brand officer at China's Huawei; Facebook's Vice President of Global Marketing Solution, Carolyn Everson and Robin Raskin, a longtime partner of the conference, an original protégé of Bill Gates and one of the first female coders. Garcia addressed the elephant in the room: that this year, of all years, i.e. in the midst of #metoo and #timesup CES Keynote speakers were all male. Thus a hashtag had surfaced similar to 2015 Oscar's: #cessomale. And it was. From Booth Babes to Robot Strippers it wasn't the most comfortable place for women present, as objectification seemed to override participation.

ELLE USA Editor-in-Chief Nina Garcia moderates panel at CES 2018. Photo Courtesy of CES

However, the panelists proposed their solutions for the keynote dilemma as well as increasing the numbers for women in STEM and Everson had the most concrete and doable actions of the panel--all delivered in such a contagious and upbeat way, the audience left feeling like we'd almost already won.

The room clapped when she stated: "Out of all years, this would not be the year to not attempt 50 percent representation. I think it just takes a commitment. The answer I won't accept is that it's hard. Because if we said it was hard, it would be hard to find black females to join your company, it would be hard to find U.S. Hispanic women to join your company at senior levels, it would be hard to find enough gender diversity around LGBTQ. Guess what, life's hard, we have to commit to it and get it done."

She introduced real-life solutions such as requiring sensitivity and anti-harassment training at Facebook, even for those attending a one off event. She also discussed mandatory unconscious bias training started by Sheryl Sandberg that is used in Facebook's review process. "During our review process we screen for words that are typically used in bias situations," Everson explained. "So if we see female reviews and the term aggressive is being used, or bossy, that gets flagged. It goes back to the manager and we ask them to go into more depth–what do you mean by that? Is it a bias—would you call a man bossy? And by the way we do it for men too," she said and also detailed Facebook's diversity focused approach to hiring and equal pay protocol.

"Even if you don't agree morally, it's good for business," she said about fighting ageism, sexism, racism, trans phobia, and classism at the tech workplace.

She also discussed getting young girls interested in STEM. "Computer science degrees for a long time have been stagnant around 18 percent for young girls. We have to get that up to 50 percent or more so you have a better pipeline, particularly on the engineering side." She said she's been advocating for coding to be considered a foreign language, and a requirement in schools, an interesting solution. Robin Raskin, who taught herself to code under the tutelage of Bill Gates agreed “I think we have to start super young," Raskin mentioned the Young Innovators to Watch program which is like a science fair on steroids, it sponsors high school students and their families to CES. This year, students presented projects which focused on cancer detection and amblyopia treatment. “If you don't have hope after seeing these kids," Raskin stated.

The global voice, Huawei Chief Brand Officer Glory Cheung discussed women's contribution to tech such having a woman's perspective on the CEO Richard Yu's keynote. She was the only woman in the room when they received news only a few hours earlier that changed the entire tone of the presentation. The men wanted to use logic, focus on the benefits and attributes of the new phone, and stick to business and moving forward, but Cheung suggested to Yu that he ditch his script and speak from his heart and express his feelings as a human being. He followed the advice and many called his Huawei keynote the best at the conference. Cheung says having women in decision-making positions makes sense because simply women know what other women want. She also used an example of a female designer creating earbuds that double as jewelry as an example of something an all male design team might not ever think of. She noted that China too was having a watershed moment for women that resulted in strong female role models the West had not heard of yet who nonetheless were inspiring young women and girls in Huawei's headquarters. She said the movement was rippling throughout the world as “digital feminism."

Elle's EIC and moderator Garcia began by addressing the fact that for women of color the uphill battle and silencing is ten-fold. “We don't have time to address each 'ism' one by one" so she suggested they tackle the issue as one. She addressed how she found herself in the position of moderating and gave simple words of advice to women, women-identified and gender non-binary folks everywhere: “Take every opportunity." That's what Robin Raskin did, when Bill Gates read her PC World article “How I Learned to Use a Computer to Save our Marriage" which paid her $25 and offered to teach her how to code.

The panelists discussed their favorite uses of tech, Huang said it was showing her son dinosaur videos on her Huawei using a projection beam while doing business at the same time. Everson talked about her favorite apps like Waze and Daily Plank. Raskin said she considered herself a translator for tech and was thrilled about the beauty tech display that year at CES.

The conference clearly answered the question about how to engage and represent women in tech. Many of the solutions, such as those Carolyn Everson mentioned, are available to the public. So, hopefully, there will be no excuses next year and the speakers at CES will be 50 percent female. The problem may be that STEM and tech, in particular, is not unappealing for women to work in, it was just unfriendly. The hopeful news is that while women hold just 24 percent of STEM jobs, they do make 35 percent more than women in non-STEM counterparts in the private sector, so here's to a future full of females in tech.

5 Min Read
Career

How Fitness Saved My Life and Became My Career

Sometimes it takes falling to rock bottom in order to be built back up again. I learned this many years ago when the life I'd carefully built for myself and my family suddenly changed. But in those times, you learn to lean on those who love you – a friend, family member or someone who can relate to what you've been through. I was lucky enough to have two incredible women help me through one of my lowest moments. They taught me to love myself and inspired me to pass on their lessons each da

If it weren't for the empowering women who stepped up and brought fitness back into my life, I wouldn't be standing – in the door of my own business – today.

In 2010, I was a wife, a mother of three, and had filtered in and out of jobs depending on what my family needed from me. At different points in my career, I've worked in the corporate world, been a stay-at-home mom, and even started my own daycare center. Fitness has always been a part of my life, but at that point being a mom was my main priority. Then, life threw a curveball. My husband and I separated, leading to a very difficult divorce.

These were difficult times. I lost myself in the uncertainty of my future and the stress that comes with a divorce and found myself battling anorexia. Over a matter of months, I lost 40 lbs. and felt surrounded by darkness. I was no longer participating in my health and all efforts to stay active came to a halt. I didn't want to leave my home, I didn't' want to talk to people, and I really did not want to see men. Seeing my struggles, first my sister and then a friend, approached me and invited me to visit the gym.

After months of avoiding it, my sister started taking me to the gym right before closing when it wasn't too busy. We started slow, on the elliptical or the treadmill. This routine got me out of the house and slowly we worked to regain my strength and my self-esteem. When my sister moved away, my good friend and personal trainer started working out with me one-on-one early in the morning, taking time out of her busy schedule to keep me on track toward living a healthy life once again. Even when I didn't want to leave the house, she would encourage me to push myself and I knew I didn't want to let her down. She helped me every step of the way. My sister and my friend brought fitness back into my everyday routine. They saved my life.

I began to rely on fitness, as well as faith, to help me feel like myself again. My friend has since moved away, but, these two women made me feel loved, confident and strong with their empowerment and commitment to me. They made such an incredible impact on me; I knew I needed to pay it forward. I wanted to have the same impact on women in my community. I started by doing little things, like running with a woman who just had a baby to keep her inspired and let her know she's not alone. I made sure not to skip my regular runs, just in case there was a woman watching who needed the inspiration to keep going. These small steps of paying it forward helped me find purpose and belonging. This gave me a new mentality that put me on a path to the opportunity of a lifetime – opening a women's only kickboxing gym, 30 Minute Hit.

About four years ago, I was officially an empty nester. It was time to get myself out of the house too and find what I was truly passionate about, which is easier said than done. Sitting behind a desk, in a cubicle, simply didn't cut it. It was hard to go from an active and chaotic schedule to a very slow paced, uneventful work week. I felt sluggish. Even when I moved to another company where I got to plan events and travel, it was enjoyable, but not fulfilling. I wanted to be a source of comfort to those struggling, as my sister and dear friend had been to me. I wanted to impact others in a way that couldn't be done from behind a desk.

I began to rely on fitness, as well as faith, to help me feel like myself again.

When I heard about 30 Minute Hit, I was nervous to take the leap. But the more I learned about the concept, the more I knew it was the perfect fit for me. Opening my own gym where women can come to let go of their struggles, rely on one another and meet new people is the best way for me to pass on the lessons I learned during my darkest times.

Kickboxing is empowering in itself. Add to it a high energy, female-only environment, and you have yourself a powerhouse! The 30 Minute Hit concept is franchised all over North America, acting as a source of release for women who are just trying to get through their day. I see women of all ages come into my gym, kick the heck out of a punching bag and leave with a smile on their face, often times alongside a new friend. 30 Minute Hit offers a convenient schedule for all women, from busy moms to working women, to students and senior citizens. A schedule-free model allows members to come in whenever they have a free half hour to dedicate to themselves. Offering certified training in kickboxing and a safe environment to let go, 30 Minute Hit is the place for women empowerment and personal growth.

Through my journey, I have learned that everyone is going through something – everyone is on their own path. My motivating factor is knowing that I can touch people's lives everyday just by creating the space for encouragement and community. It's so easy to show people you care. That's the type of environment my team, clients and myself have worked hard to create at our 30 Minute Hit location.

Fitness saved my life. If it weren't for the empowering women who stepped up and brought fitness back into my life, I wouldn't be standing – in the door of my own business – today. The perfect example of women empowering women – the foundation to invincibility.

This article was originally published September 12, 2019.