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"I Woke Up Like This" - Or Did I?

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There's a trend on the rise. It's taking hold and creating a safe environment for the rising generation of women to feel comfortable expressing themselves and how they present their image to the wider world.


Honesty.

It's something we, as consumers of media, be it social or otherwise have been been denied for years. First, it was airbrushing, now, it's "I woke up like this." Really, they (the eponymous 'they meaning influencers, celebrities, your pretty BFF) did not wake up like this. It's an ironic lie. But where did it come from?

The nexus of I woke up like this began a couple years ago, and can perhaps even be attributed to Beyoncé with her hit "Flawless" and the Kardashians, who, airbrushed and blow-dried, have posted many photos on social, from bed, with the ironic tag line "I woke up like this" and people have seriously believed them.

And while perhaps this appears seemingly innocent, a joke even, research conducted pertaining to the trend has found, that because of this rhetoric, millennials are increasingly downplaying how long they spend getting ready so as not to appear too overdone or flawless. TRESemmê, who spearheaded the research, found that 7/10 millennials will not tell people how much time they actually spent getting ready, for fear they'll be judged.

Hosted by actress, model and entrepreneur Cara Santana, the panel included psychologist Judy Ho, who worked with TRESemmé on their campaign, Justine Marjan, TRESemmé Global Stylist, Rebecca Minkoff, and Cushnie et Ochs Co-founders Michelle Ochs and Carly Cushnie. Together, the ladies spoke about the importance of transparency in this age of social media, and encouraged women to talk openly about their beauty regimes.

"It's better to arrive late than arrive with bad hair"

-Justine Marjan

This campaign is a veritable lesson in empowerment and speech; don't let what you believe someone might think of you get in the way of what you say. Allow yourself to be completely honest about your beauty prep, own the fact that your hairdo took 2 hours of blood, sweat and tears that morning, because you look good.

TRESemmé hair statement

Judy Ho spoke with SWAAY about the campaign, and why it's so important for millennial women to embrace the beginning of the day as a kickstarter to success, and not an impediment.

"It started with some key figures and celebrities basically saying, 'I don't really work out, I just eat right - and I look like this' and this was a few years ago that statements like this began coming out" Ho begins, continuing, "and then millennials just jumped on it."

"Millennials then start thinking - those are the standards that I have to uphold. The problem, of course, is that it's impossible to uphold," says Ho. Getting ready takes time. No matter what level of sophistication or glamour you're putting into your look. Looking effortless, takes a whole lot of effort. And it's important that girls growing up see that yes, in order for their favorite influencer or actress to look as good as she does, she's probably spent between 1-2 hours - for just a single photo in many cases!

"Work your hair like it's your job"

-Dr. Judy Ho

Cara Santana, Actress, Model and Beauty Entrepreneur, founded The Glam App in 2015 with Joey Maalouf, which is basically an Uber, but for beauty. Order an express blow-out or makeover delivered right to your door (and while that's happening, go stalk her Instagram, because it's simply fabulous), and enjoy the at-home glam experience you've always dreamed of.

Santana saw the white space for a beautified and stylist-specific version of Seamless and dove head-first to wide critical acclaim. Coming to New York for the app's partnership launch with TRESemmé, Santana proved a worthy host for the panel of powerhouse women.

Cara Santana. Photo courtesy of WENN.com

And, until September 23rd, Tresemmé has teamed with The Glam App to get you blow-outs, or "Work It Waves" express delivered to your door, just enter the code "TRESWorkIt" for this hairstyle when you check out and be the glam queen you truly are.

So, in light of the fact that hundreds of videos will surface this week on social channels of the prep for fashion week - please take the "I woke up like this" fad with a grain of salt. Because it really is fake news. The Gigis, Kendalls and Kaias of the world will all spend hours on their appearance, and don' you forget it.

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Fresh Voices

How I Went From Shy Immigrant to Co-Founder of OPI, the World's #1 Nail Brand

In many ways I am a shining example of the American Dream. I was born in Hungary during the Communist era, and my family fled to Israel before coming to the U.S. in pursuit of freedom and safety. When we arrived, I was just a young, shy girl who couldn't speak English. After my childhood in Hungary, New York City was a marvel; I couldn't believe that such a lively, rich place existed. Even a simple thing like going to the market and seeing all the bright, colorful produce and having so many choices was new to me. I'll never take that for granted. I think it's where my love affair with color truly began.


One thing I had was a strong work ethic. I worked hard in school, to learn English, and at jobs including my first job at Dairy Queen -- which I loved! Ice cream is easily my favorite food. From there, I moved into the garment district where my brother-in-law's family had a business. During this time, I was able to see how a business was run and began to hone in on my eye for aesthetics and willingness to work hard at any task I was given.

Eventually, my brother-in-law bought a dental supply company in Los Angeles and asked me to join him. LA, a place with 365-days of sunshine. How could I say no? The company started as Odontorium Products Inc. During the acrylic movement of the 1980s, we realized that nail technicians were buying our product, and that the same components used for dentures were used for artificial nails. We saw a potential opening in the market, and we seized it. OPI began dropping off the "rubber band special" at every salon on Ventura Blvd. in Los Angeles. A jar of powder, liquid and primer – rubber-banded together – became the OPI Traditional Acrylic System and was a huge hit, giving OPI its start in the professional nail industry. It was 1981 when OPI first opened its doors. I couldn't have predicted our success, but I knew that hard work and faith in myself would be key in transforming a new business into a company with global reach.

When we started OPI, what we were doing was something new. Before OPI came on the scene, the generic, utilitarian nail polish names already on the market – like Red No. 4, Pink No. 2 – were completely forgettable. We rebranded the category with catchy names that we knew women could relate to and would remember. The industry was stale and boring, so we made it more fun and sexy. We started creating color collections. I carefully developed 30 groundbreaking colors for the debut collection -- many of which are still beloved bestsellers today, including Malaga Wine, Alpine Snow and Kyoto Pearl.

There is no other nail color brand in the world that touches the totality of industries the way OPI does.

With deep roots in Tinseltown, we eventually started collaborating with Hollywood. Our decision to collaborate with the entertainment industry also propelled OPI forward in another way, ultimately leading us to finding a way to connect with women beyond the world of beauty, relating our products to the beverages they drink, the cars they drive, the movies they watch, the clothes they wear – even the shade they use to paint their living room walls! There is no other nail color brand in the world that touches the totality of industries the way OPI does. It also propelled my growth as a businessperson forward. I found myself sitting in meetings with executives from some of the top companies in the world. I didn't have a fancy presentation. I didn't have a Harvard business degree. I realized that what I had was passion. I had a passion for what we were doing, and I had my own unique story that no one else could replicate.

Discipline, hard work, and passion gave me the confidence to grow from that shy immigrant girl to become the person that I am today

Bit by bit, I grew up with the business. Discipline, hard work, and passion gave me the confidence to grow from that shy immigrant girl to become the person that I am today -- an author, public speaker, and co-founder of OPI, the world's #1 professional nail brand.

I learned quickly that one can be an expert at many things, but not everything. Running a business is very hard work. Luckily, I had someone I could collaborate with who brought something new to the table and complemented my talents, my brother-in-law George Schaeffer. My business "superpower," or the ability to make decisions quickly and confidently, kept me ahead of trends and competition.

Another key to my success in building this brand and in growing in business was being authentic. Authenticity is so important to brands and maybe even more so now in the time of social media when you can speak directly to your consumers. I realized even then that I could only be me. I was a woman who knew what I wanted. I looked at my mother and daughter and wanted to create products that would excite and empower them.

There's often an expectation placed on women in charge that they need to be cutthroat to be competitive, but that's not true. Rather than focusing on my gender or any implied limitations I might bring to the job as a female and a mother, I always focused instead on my vision. I deliberately fostered an environment at OPI filled with warmth. After all, at the end of the day, your organization is only as good as its people. I've always found that being nice, being humble, and listening to others has served me well. Instead of pushing others down to get to the top, inspire them and bring them along on the journey.

You can read more about my personal and professional journey in my new memoir out now, I'm Not Really a Waitress: How One Woman Took Over the Beauty Industry One Color at a Time.