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This Legendary Actress Went From '90s Sitcom Star to Renaissance Woman

People

Daphne Maxwell Reid may be best known for playing Vivian “Aunt Viv" Banks on the beloved '90s sitcom The Fresh Prince of Bel Air—and for gracefully taking over the role during the end of the show's third season. But, there's so much more to Reid's story and career—that starts before Fresh Prince ever aired and goes long after the show ended in 1996.


Passionate about photography, cooking, and design, Reid considers Daphne Style, her custom line of Chinese silk brocade jackets, to be wearable works of art. She's published five fine art photography books that feature doors and doorways from around the world, and recently released her first cookbook, Grace + Soul & Motherwit: A Cookbook Spiced with Personal Memories.

To give all her projects the time and energy needed to thrive, Reid is a master at the delicate art of prioritizing. “I was given the God-given blessings of gifts," Reid explains. "And gifts are the talents that I need to express to the world. I just take each one as it inspires me and see where I can go with it and learn what I can through the process of developing it. The learning process is my favorite part. Learning how to do something, market something and express something in the most fulfilling way."

With so much success and personal gratification to relish in, Reid is determined to influence and inspire the younger generation of African-American men and women to find, follow and execute their passions too. “I found that all of these threads of experiences weave the tapestry that makes my life fulfilled. I want to make sure that kids don't get jaded and unfocused," she explains. “I want them to realize that they can achieve whatever they desire if they have the willpower, if they get up when they fall down, if they make sure that there are joy and compassion in their life. It just all rounds out beautifully."

While Reid has found success as an actress, model, artist and more—she didn't follow a set path to check off all those boxes on her resume. Instead, as she went along for the ride, she remained open to where the twists and turns might lead.

“When you set your goals, you decide, 'Oh, this is what I want to do. This is what I want to be,'" says Reid. “But, life has its own playbook. If you're living your life fully, you may be guided toward something else, but you'll eventually get back to what you're dreaming about. The sidetrack is to gain additional knowledge that you'll need to help that dream along."

Reid was the first black woman to grace the cover of Glamour. This 1969 cover would go on to change her life

Reid knows a little something about getting sidetracked. As a teenager, she started modeling in the pages of Seventeen magazine's “Real Girl" issue. A merit scholar with plans to attend Northwestern University in Chicago, modeling was not in Reid's big picture plans. “I was looking for a career first as a science teacher and then as an interior designer and architect. That's where I was focused." So, Reid framed the chance to model as a “blessing" and decided to pursue it while in college. She flew back and forth between Chicago and New York City for just $25 a round trip.

For one shoot, her agent instructed her to arrive with clean hair, minimal make-up and wear just a simple red turtleneck and jacket.

“My agent said, 'Put some mascara and some lip gloss on. Pull your hair over to the side and sit on the window,'" recalls Reid. “I shot for maybe fifteen minutes—the photographer didn't take more than twenty shots." Reid got back on the plane and headed back to school not knowing how drastically her career was about to change. That “simple" photo shoot was the future cover of Glamour magazine."

With an acting career that started in the '70s, Reid has witnessed a great shift in the entertainment industry, especially within the African American community. Photo Courtesy of Daphne Maxwell Reid

And, it wasn't any cover. It was the first cover of Glamour featuring an African American woman. Being the “first" wasn't Reid's intention. “You grow up living your life, and you go on to the next opportunity," she says. “If you're graced, you're guided to places that fulfill you and opportunities that can help you be fulfilled."

While acting is a natural progression from a career in modeling, Reid didn't imagine she'd follow that path either—even though she did some theater in high school and commercials and voice-over work in Chicago. Through her modeling agency, Reid got cast on a TV series called The Duke. She enjoyed the experience so much, she decided to see what would happen if she pursued acting in the “big pond" of Los Angeles. “My career just bloomed. It was a blessing. It was manna from heaven," she says. “I was trying to do my best at it and learn everything that made it tick. That's how my career progressed. I was not the woman who had the desire to be a high fashion model or TV star. I didn't think about any of that. I went along for the ride and what a wonderful ride it has been."

With an acting career that started in the '70s, Reid has witnessed a great shift in the entertainment industry, especially within the African American community. She's especially impressed and proud because today, African Americans are making themselves heard in ways the past generations could not. “There's a long history of blacks in this business but because there's social media now, you hear more about them," she says. “When say Lena Horne was acting, when a whole plethora of black actors and actors were acting, you didn't hear about them because they didn't spread the word. But they were there, and everybody built on everybody else's career. Everybody has to move the ball when it's their time to move the ball."

Reid, however, still thinks there's much work to be done. “I'm very proud and very happy for all that I see," she says. “But, I would love to have more African Americans in decision-making roles, so that they can decide how our community is represented on television and include stories that our culture knows about, but other cultures don't, that need to be expressed on television." True to form, she is an avid TV watcher—mainly scripted shows, however, because she believes the second you stick a camera in someone's face on a reality show—the reality is over. “I like the things that Oprah is developing and of course, I love Shonda Rhimes projects, because they just show so many varied types of black people. Then, there's Empire that shows a whole 'nother canvas of wonderful characters," she says.

“I think there's too much of the BS television out there but that needs its space, too. I'm saddened by the fact that advertising drives production more than creativity does but that's just my overall, general 'TV ain't what it used to be.'"

And, because show business isn't what it used to be either, Reid has very specific advice for those just starting out. “I suggest that new actors and actresses also love something besides acting that will earn them a living," she comments. "As an actor, you're waiting to be chosen. You don't have control over where your next job is coming from. You need to be able to eat while you're waiting to be chosen and working on your craft and learning all you can about the business." And, Reid wants young people to know that being a celebrity is not the end goal. “Being a celebrity is a nice perk," she says. "I'm not going to knock it—but it's not the goal. The kids now need to focus more on quality rather than quantity."

Quality work is what Reid built her career on. And she knows that an opportunity to work on something a trailblazing project like The Fresh Prince of Bel Air is rare.

“The show is timeless. It's an example of a black family that was not seen like that before," she recalls. “The talent of Will Smith is iconic, and the show had such a wonderful array of characters. It was written so well and so truthfully."

Reid says that the cast was instrumental in helping the writers nail those cultural notes the show so famously hit on. “I remember sitting at the table read one time, and they had Ashley talking back to her father," she remarks. “We all said, 'Excuse me? If Ashley did that in our house, she wouldn't have teeth because she'd have been knocked to the other side of the room. We don't have that kind of disrespect for our parents.' The writers understood that it was cultural, and they made it work."

To be sure, Reid believes a big reason the Fresh Prince was so successful is because Will Smith, the show's fearless leader and star, was the hardest working man in show business back then—and continues to be today. “He's a brilliant man," she says. "We knew this working with him. He worked harder than anybody on that show—and we all worked hard. He was a serious businessman and knew what a performance meant to the rest of the show. He brought it every time. He's a great leader and a great learner."

One of her standout memories is sitting with Smith and the rest of the cast between takes and talking about everything from philosophy to religion to literature. “All things where we would all grow from it," Reid reminisces. But while the cast still keeps in touch—don't expect them to follow the lead of other huge '90s sitcoms and reunite with a reboot. “No, no, no—it's time to move on! The times are different, things are different, people are different," she says. “Let's talk about what's happening now and the relationships in families now. Let's not try to recreate that was magic. Besides, it replays well. We're on our third generation of watchers!"

And, Reid is inspiring all generations to keep on following their dreams and live their best lives. “I'm trying to show that no matter where you are, who you are, how much money you have, or what your circumstances are—you can dream something into being," Reid says. “You can make it happen—if you try. If you don't try?" It's why Reid has yet to retire and has no plans on stopping anytime soon. “It'll never happen. I want to encourage my generation—the older folks— not retire. Instead, I want them to move to the next chapter and find something that they can grow with. Don't stop growing just because you've reached 65 or 70. It's a wonderful time for learning something new. Follow a path and see where it leads you."

And with Reid leading the way, we'll take any path she sets on.

Career

Male Managers Afraid To Mentor Women In Wake Of #MeToo Movement

Women in the workplace have always experienced a certain degree of discrimination from male colleagues, and according to new studies, it appears that it is becoming even more difficult for women to get acclimated to modern day work environments, in wake of the #MeToo Movement.


In a recent study conducted by LeanIn.org, in partnership with SurveyMonkey, 60% of male managers confessed to feeling uncomfortable engaging in social situations with women in and outside of the workplace. This includes interactions such as mentorships, meetings, and basic work activities. This statistic comes as a shocking 32% rise from 2018.

What appears the be the crux of the matter is that men are afraid of being accused of sexual harassment. While it is impossible to discredit this fear as incidents of wrongful accusations have taken place, the extent to which it has burgeoned is unacceptable. The #MeToo movement was never a movement against men, but an empowering opportunity for women to speak up about their experiences as victims of sexual harassment. Not only were women supporting one another in sharing to the public that these incidents do occur, and are often swept under the rug, but offered men insight into behaviors and conversations that are typically deemed unwelcomed and unwarranted.

Restricting interaction with women in the workplace is not a solution, but a mere attempt at deflecting from the core issue. Resorting to isolation and exclusion relays the message that if men can't treat women how they want, then they rather not deal with them at all. Educating both men and women on what behaviors are unacceptable while also creating a work environment where men and women are held accountable for their actions would be the ideal scenario. However, the impact of denying women opportunities of mentorship and productive one-on-one meetings hinders growth within their careers and professional networks.

Women, particularly women of color, have always had far fewer opportunities for mentorship which makes it impossible to achieve growth within their careers without them. If women are given limited opportunities to network in and outside of a work environment, then men must limit those opportunities amongst each other, as well. At the most basic level, men should be approaching female colleagues as they would approach their male colleagues. Striving to achieve gender equality within the workplace is essential towards creating a safer environment.

While restricted communication and interaction may diminish the possibility of men being wrongfully accused of sexual harassment, it creates a hostile
environment that perpetuates women-shaming and victim-blaming. Creating distance between men and women only prompts women to believe that male colleagues who avoid them will look away from or entirely discredit sexual harassment they experience from other men in the workplace. This creates an unsafe working environment for both parties where the problem at hand is not solved, but overlooked.

According to LeanIn's study, only 85% of women said they feel safe on the job, a 5% drop from 2018. In the report, Jillesa Gebhardt wrote, "Media coverage that is intended to hold aggressors accountable also seems to create a sense of threat, and people don't seem to feel like aggressors are held accountable." Unfortunately, only 16% of workers believed that harassers holding high positions are held accountable for their actions which inevitably puts victims in difficult, and quite possibly dangerous, situations. 50% of workers also believe that there are more repercussions for the victims than harassers when speaking up.

In a research poll conducted by Edison Research in 2018, 30% of women agreed that their employers did not handle harassment situations properly while 53% percent of men agreed that they did. Often times, male harassers hold a significant amount of power within their careers that gives them a sense of security and freedom to go forward with sexual misconduct. This can be seen in cases such as that of Harvey Weinstein, Bill Cosby and R. Kelly. Men in power seemingly have little to no fear that they will face punishment for their actions.


Source-Alex Brandon, AP

Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook executive and founder of LeanIn.org., believes that in order for there to be positive changes within work environments, more women should be in higher positions. In an interview with CNBC's Julia Boorstin, Sandberg stated, "you know where the least sexual harassment is? Organizations that have more women in senior leadership roles. And so, we need to mentor women, we need to sponsor women, we need to have one-on-one conversations with them that get them promoted." Fortunately, the number of women in leadership positions are slowly increasing which means the prospect of gender equality and safer work environments are looking up.

Despite these concerning statistics, Sandberg does not believe that movements such as the Times Up and Me Too movements, have been responsible for the hardship women have been experiencing in the workplace. "I don't believe they've had negative implications. I believe they're overwhelmingly positive. Because half of women have been sexually harassed. But the thing is it is not enough. It is really important not to harass anyone. But that's pretty basic. We also need to not be ignored," she stated. While men may be feeling uncomfortable, putting an unrealistic amount of distance between themselves and female coworkers is more harmful to all parties than it is beneficial. Men cannot avoid working with women and vice versa. Creating such a hostile environment is also detrimental to any business as productivity and communication will significantly decrease.

The fear or being wrongfully accused of sexual harassment is a legitimate fear that deserves recognition and understanding. However, restricting interactions with women in the workplace is not a sensible solution as it can have negatively impact a woman's career. Companies are in need of proper training and resources to help both men and women understand what is appropriate workplace behavior. Refraining from physical interactions, commenting on physical appearance, making lewd or sexist jokes and inquiring about personal information are also beneficial steps towards respecting your colleagues' personal space. There is still much work to be done in order to create safe work environments, but with more and more women speaking up and taking on higher positions, women can feel safer and hopefully have less contributions to make to the #MeToo movement.