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Four Books To Help Kick Your 2018 Finances Into Gear

Finance

One of the most challenging things about starting your own business revolves around your very own cold hard cash. When you're starting out, you may scratch your head over how much you should pull from your savings account and dump into backing your idea. You may even head on over to the bank to chat about getting a loan to help fuel your mighty business plan.


Once the money starts pouring in, the head scratches over your money become even more confusing at times. You'll start to wonder how you should do your business accounting, pay taxes correctly, and even attempt to figure out how much of a salary you should take for yourself every month.

The best places to look for some of those answers are right inside books written by other fierce and fearless female entrepreneurs. Here are four of the best financial advice books to pick up this month:

1. Get Your Advice from a Shark

Book: Shark Tales: How I Turned $1,000 into a Billion Dollar Business

Author: Barbara Corcoran

If you've ever tuned into ABC's Shark Tank, you'll know Barbara Corcoran for her poise, determination, and at times, ruthlessness. But, you may wonder how she became a major player in real estate and the owner of a $6 billion dollar business. Her book tells her real-life story of how at age 22, she borrowed $1,000 from her boyfriend, quit her job as a waitress and started a small real estate office in New York City. Through her stories, you're able to watch her journey unfold and see how she took a small amount of borrowed cash and created a well-known empire.

2. Build a Relationship With Your Cash

Book: Worth it: Your Life, Your Money, Your Terms

Author: Amanda Steinberg

Who better to take money advice from than the founder of a financial site for women, Dailyworth.com. Amanda Steinberg's book dives deep into the relationships that women have with self-worth and money. The book outlines the key financial information that women need to know, while also cracking down on why women feel stressed and anxious when it comes to their own finances. She allows readers to feel as though money can be a source of freedom and independence, and that alone is why the book is worthy of a read.

3. Become a Badass With Your Cash

Book: You Are a Badass at Making Money: Master the Mindset of Wealth

Author: Jen Sincero

You may have already fallen in love with Jen Sincero after reading her first book, You are a Badass, a couple of years ago. But she's back and this time; she's here to spew money advice that you've never heard before. Jen explores her own money transformation through personal essays with bite-size concepts and digestible advice. She helps readers tap into their natural ability to become rich, relate to money in a new way, and uncover what's holding a person back from making money.

4. Learn How to Go Big Instead of Going Home

Book: Million Dollar Women: The Essential Guide for Female Entrepreneurs Who Want to Go Big

Author: Julia Pimsleur

If you're looking for a book that gives advice from a handful of women entrepreneurs, who have raised capital, created powerful networks, and built multimillion-dollar companies – from scratch – this book is the one you should check out. It gives you the tips you need to secure funding, scale up and make the right connections. Plus, you'll find exercises at the end so that you can start working on your own money plan and strategy before you flip to the final page of this book.

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Career

Momtors: The New Wave of Mentors Helping New Moms Transition Back Into Careers

New parents re-entering the workforce are often juggling the tangible realities of daycare logistics, sleep deprivation, and a cascade of overwhelming work. No matter how parents build their family, they often struggle with the guilt of being split between home and work and not feeling exceptionally successful in either place.


Women building their families often face a set of challenges different from men. Those who have had children biologically may be navigating the world of pumping at work. Others might feel pulled in multiple directions when bringing a child into their home after adoption. Some women are trying to learn how to care for a newborn for the first time. New parents need all the help they can get with their transition.

Women returning to work after kids sometimes have to address comments such as:

"I didn't think you'd come back."

"You must feel so guilty."

"You missed a lot while you were out."

To counteract this difficult situation, women are finding mentors and making targeting connections. Parent mentors can help new moms address integrating their new life realities with work, finding resources within the organization and local community, and create connections with peers.

There's also an important role for parent mentors to play in discussing career trajectory. Traditionally, men who have families see more promotions compared to women with children. Knowing that having kids may represent a career setback for women, they may work with their mentors to create an action plan to "back on track" or to get recognized for their contributions as quickly as possible after returning to work.

Previously, in a bid to accommodate mothers transitioning back to work, corporate managers would make a show at lessoning the workload for newly returned mothers. This approach actually did more harm than good, as the mother's skills and ambitions were marginalized by these alleged "family friendly" policies, ultimately defining her for the workplace as a mother, rather than a person focused on career.

Today, this is changing. Some larger organizations, such as JP Morgan Chase, have structured mentorship programs that specifically target these issues and provide mentors for new parents. These programs match new parents navigating a transition back to work with volunteer mentors who are interested in helping and sponsoring moms. Mentors in the programs do not need to be moms, or even parents, themselves, but are passionate about making sure the opportunities are available.

It's just one other valuable way corporations are evolving when it comes to building quality relationships with their employees – and successfully retaining them, empowering women who face their own set of special barriers to career growth and leadership success.

Mentoring will always be a two way street. In ideal situations, both parties will benefit from the relationship. It's no different when women mentor working mothers getting back on track on the job. But there a few factors to consider when embracing this new form of mentorship

How to be a good Momtor?

Listen: For those mentoring a new parent, one of the best strategies to take is active listening. Be present and aware while the mentee shares their thoughts, repeat back what you hear in your own words, and acknowledge emotions. The returning mother is facing a range of emotions and potentially complicated situations, and the last thing she wants to hear is advice about how she should be feeling about the transition. Instead, be a sounding board for her feelings and issues with returning to work. Validate her concerns and provide a space where she can express herself without fear of retribution or bull-pen politics. This will allow the mentee a safe space to sort through her feelings and focus on her real challenges as a mother returning to work.

Share: Assure the mentee that they aren't alone, that other parents just like them are navigating the transition back to work. Provide a list of ways you've coped with the transition yourself, as well as your best parenting tips. Don't be afraid to discuss mothering skills as well as career skills. Work on creative solutions to the particular issues your mentee is facing in striking her new work/life balance.

Update Work Goals: A career-minded woman often faces a new reality once a new child enters the picture. Previous career goals may appear out of reach now that she has family responsibilities at home. Each mentee is affected by this differently, but good momtors help parents update her work goals and strategies for realizing them, explaining, where applicable, where the company is in a position to help them with their dreams either through continuing education support or specific training initiatives.

Being a role model for a working mother provides a support system, at work, that they can rely on just like the one they rely on at home with family and friends. Knowing they have someone in the office, who has knowledge about both being a mom and a career woman, will go a long way towards helping them make the transition successfully themselves.