#SWAAYthenarrative
BETA
Close

9 Female Entrepreneurs Share Their Favorite Podcasts

Business

It's okay if you've been so heads-down with your nose-to-the-grind that you've completely missed the boat of podcasts. As a trendy way to boost your creativity, spark your imagination and mold you into a better leader, there are countless entrepreneurial talks available.


While listening to a podcast over music while you're cooking, commuting or working on yet another report is a smarter way to multitask than say, listening to music, it can be overwhelming to get started. Luckily, many female founders and CEOs have navigated the pool for you already, and offer their best recommendations for stimulating hosts, topics and shows. Warm up your headphones, grab your portable charger and tune in:

How I Built This

From: Caroline Danehy, the co-founder of Fair Harbor, a men's sustainable swimwear company.

Why: All of the different stories from the co-founders each had the same theme: businesses don't become successful overnight. Featuring different entrepreneurs, it was inspiring to hear how they overcame various hurdles and their journeys to where they are today. Two of my favorite podcasts featured Drybar and Honest Tea. Alli Webb, the founder of Drybar, discussed how she started Drybar from a small idea while doing her friends' hair. Specializing in one thing, perfecting hair, and focusing on that, her motto has become 'focus on one thing and be the best at it.'. Throughout the podcast, Alli exemplified characteristics of persistence and determination. It was clear that once she had her mind set on something, she wasn't going to let anything or anyone get in the way of achieving it."

Online Marketing Made Easy With Amy Porterfield

From: Kylie Carlson, the CEO of leading education institution in the wedding industry, The Academy of Wedding and Event Planning, offering an online course for wedding planners, stylists and designers.

Why: “What I love about Amy Porterfield is that most of her podcasts are solid 'How To's' where she shares her own processes with you and you finish off feeling like you've really learned something you can apply to your own business. I love a good takeaway when I'm listening to a podcast, and Amy gives you action plans and easy to digest information that is simple to understand and easy to apply."

Startup by Gimlet Media

From: Meghan Ely, the owner of OFD Consulting, a niche PR firm exclusively serving the wedding industry.

Why: “I love the transparent nature in which they share how to get a small business off of the ground. The founder Alex Blumberg is a celebrated member of the podcast industry, but even he had to face the inevitable lows of being an entrepreneur for the very first time. I've been able to appreciate, and learn from, the challenges they've faced as they've grown rapidly: staffing, work/life balance as a parent and scaling smartly."

Loose Threads

From: Vanessa Jeswani, co-founder of Nomad Lane, a brand of travel accessories that are smartly made at an affordable price.

Why: “This podcast is focused on innovation in fashion and retail. The podcast features interviews with founders of brands that are revolutionizing the consumer economy, from direct to consumer business models to manufacturing innovations. It's perfect for anyone who is interested in learning about new retail channels, inventory management, starting a fashion/lifestyle brand and innovative marketing campaigns. Richie, the interviewer, asks detailed and important questions so listeners can understand what really goes on behind the scenes."

That's So Retrograde

From: Kelly Pace Stegman, the founder of Pace & Love Marketing, specializing in food marketing strategy for emerging businesses.

Why: “This is a good podcast for people who may have dipped their toe into zen, horoscopes and self-care to dive head first into the world of wellness. The LA-based podcast discusses everything from yoga, crystals and juice to anti-aging skin treatments, alchemy and intuition. It's light, but goes deep and perfect when I am on a long drive and would rather learn about buzz over business."

Biz Chix

From: Anna Osgoodby, co-founder of Bold & Pop, a brand, website design and social media collective that helps small business owners and bloggers reach their goals through brand development and marketing strategies.

Why: “I really love this podcast because it is founded by a business coach, Natalie Eckdahl, and is focused specifically on women entrepreneurs. Natalie interviews entrepreneurs across industries and it is always interesting to hear firsthand of their experiences and what has been most successful for them. She also does live coaching sessions which are very useful to hear how other business owner's challenges are addressed and how they sort out what is next for their journeys."

Marie Forleo

From: Neely Raffellini, founder of the 9 to 5 Project, which helps women with easy-to-follow job search tools and advice, including career coaching, resume writing, ongoing support and more.

Why: “Most episodes of this podcast are under ten minutes - except for the ones with a guest - so it's a quick way to grab a life and/or business lesson with the all-around awesome Marie Forleo. Recent episodes have focused on everything from gratitude to networking."

The Life Coach School Podcast by Brooke Castillo

From: Misha Gillingham, luxury travel blogger and influencer and founder of Wildluxe. Her Instagram show, Luxury Travel Show, takes viewers on 60 video tours through the more luxurious properties around the globe. Wildluxe also donates 100 percent of profits to charities to help underprivileged children worldwide.

Why: “After battling cancer I learned just how short life can be and I knew I needed to make some changes in order to live the life I had dreamt of. Brooke's podcast teaches listeners how to accomplish goals without being bound by fear. It is highly motivational and helps me in business and almost every other aspect of my life. Brooke's words of wisdom have changed the way I think, and as cliche as this sounds, I am now able to live the life I have always dreamed of. I am traveling the world in total luxury, and getting paid to do it! Additionally, The Life Coach School Podcast has improved the important relationships in my life. The core values of Brooke's podcasts can be applied to anyone in any situation."

Girl Boss Radio

From: Suneera Madhani, the CEO and founder of Fattmerchant, a subscription-based payment technology provider offering direct-cost pricing, analytics and omnichannel integrated payments solutions to businesses.

Why: “One of my favorite podcast hosts is Sophia Amoruso, who interviews entrepreneurs from all different industries and has an entrepreneurial journey of her own. She blends learning and fun into one, and it works really well without being forced. This is a much lighter, relatable podcast that focuses solely on girl bosses, something I believe in wholeheartedly."

Our newsletter that womansplains the week
3min read
Self

I Have Been Bullied Both At School and At Work. Here's What It Taught Me

Starting with a little background, I am an anti-bullying advocate and have recently graduated from The Parent Leadership Training Institute, where as part of our studies we were asked to come up with a community project close to our hearts and put it into action. My cause was bullying, and I began a blog and Facebook page to address issues pertaining to all forms of bullying. Implementing this project was followed by a thre- minute speech to my peers, and, after all this, here is what I have learned about bullying.


Bullying makes people feel bad about themselves, leading to feelings of inadequacy, low self-esteem and even physical symptoms. The repercussions of bullying can cause people to miss school or work as well as countless other negative side effects.

I have been bullied both at school and at work, and I know of others who have suffered the same plight. It is not fun!

My first bullying experience was in seventh grade as a young teen. There was a group of three "mean girls" who harassed me and, I later found out, several of my friends; they thought it was funny to pick on others about their clothes, their looks or whatever else they could come up with (who knows). It felt awful at the time. Supposedly, I was chosen to get picked on because they claimed I bought my clothes at the Goodwill. That wasn't true, but really who cares? Why they were picking on me was never really the point. Luckily, after a while, the meanies went on to the next victim(s) like a never-ending cycle. I tend to think once a bully, always a bully, which goes to show how good a lifestyle that is, because those "mean girls" never amounted to much. In hindsight, I feel sorry for them. Watch the movie The Gift if you're really curious about what happens to bullies when they grow up.

And bullying was not just an issue when I was a teen, since then nothing much has changed. My own nephew was bullied in eighth grade, and he recently talked to me in depth about of how the bullying took a toll on him. Especially because I had the same experience, I could relate to him in ways that some others couldn't. Like reliving my own memories, I was incredibly broken up to hear how it made him feel.

Even worse than that, bullying does not end in the school yard. Employees are being bullied on the job at an alarming rate. When you are bullied on the job as an adult, it taken an even bigger toll. Further it doesn't just go away like those middle school "mean girls." Unless you can quit your job, you might just be stuck. There are all kinds of physical symptoms, stomach pains, migraines and even panic attacks. Beyond the physical, people's mental and emotional state is extremely sensitive to bullying, and as a result work performance might suffer. Furthermore, it might feel like there is no recourse, no one to believe you. You can hope that the HR Department is willing to listen and do something about it, but the whole process can be so disheartening. And in the hierarchical corporate environment, sometimes the bully seems to get ahead and you are left lagging behind in a subservient position. This is what happened to me as a victim of workplace bullying. It started with me being told by a co-worker that my boss was following me to the bathroom, staring down the hall whenever I left my desk to make sure I came right back to my seat. Then it was standing over me as I typed, ordering me to get in a car with them, not allowing me to sit somewhere if it wasn't within their sight. The list of offenses could go on endlessly. There were times I felt like I couldn't breathe. And then, the bully torturing me got a promotion. Like the character of Miranda Priestly in The Devil Wears Prada, the classic bully is revered by her peers, despite the fact that all of her employees are terrified of her. Yet, she is in a role of high stature and praised as a bully. We live in a culture that is not only complacent in the existence of bullies, but one that actively allows them to thrive.

It makes you realize how unfair life can be. Of course, no one said that life would be fair; maybe you just assumed that bad people would not get ahead. But, they do. Even now, I cannot help but to shake my head in disbelief. I often wonder what makes a person feel the need to laud their power over another. Are they insecure? Were they bullied themselves? They must feel bad about themselves in some way? Do they feel the need to do this to make themselves look good? Whatever the reason, it certainly isn't nice at all. I have found myself at different times in my life standing up for people who have been bullied around me. And I certainly do not allow anyone to treat me in any way that I find disrespectful. I truly believe in karma, and I tell myself that at some point in time, the bullies will get it back in some way. I have seen it happen, and in the meantime, I just say to myself "What goes around, comes around."

Bullying shows no sign of slowing down, and in this day and age, it's even worse than I have experienced in the past. Cyber bulling, rumors, fist fights, knifes, guns and other forms of both mental and physical cruelty, it truly sickens me. I know that I cannot save everyone, but I try to be an advocate as much as possible and encourage others to do so as well. NO ONE SHOULD BULLIED! It is disgraceful to say the least. You should always practice grace as much as you can. With every person who chooses to do so, the world gets a little bit better. I will be writing more on this topic on a regular basis; I feel it helps to talk about this subject aloud and spread the word. and, if nothing else, be kind.