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7 Female Entrepreneurs Share Their 2019 Word of the Year and Its Importance

Self

Many studies have shown that most people fail at keeping their New Years resolutions. According to one statistic reported by U.S. News and World Report, 80% of people will fail by the second week of February.


This year, instead of making a long list of resolutions that you will most likely not stick to, try something different. Think of a word or theme that you want to focus on all year. Choose a word that will positively impact your life as a whole. The key to this exercise is to choose only ONE word; not three or five things you want to focus on for the year. Choosing just one, will keep you from being overwhelmed. It will help you stay on track and will give you clarity as you make decisions throughout the year. Weave this word into your daily routine and lifestyle. If you stay consistent and always go back to your word throughout the year, you'll see significant changes in your life and business.

Here are seven female entrepreneurs who share their 2019 Word of the Year and Why.

FUN – “I feel like we put so much focus into achievement, and then again into shutting off.. but what happened to the fun? I plan to learn how to DJ and go to as many salsa, belly dance and African dance classes as possible."

- Sahara Rose, Best-selling Ayurveda Author and Host of Highest Self Podcast

CHOICE – “The power of Choice reminds us that in every situation or decision we always have at least two options when deciding our next action step and is the basis of living free. CHOOSING our actions empowers us to feel like we're involved in life's process, and not just taking what's being given our way, and in turn, offers us the opportunity to create the life we really desire to live."

- Sara Quiriconi, Founder and Creator of the Live Free Manifesto, Unfck Your Body Series, and Author of Living {Cancer} Free

MENTAL FREEDOM – “What I've witnessed with my clients and students in 2018 is a lot of internal struggle and desire to break free from the self-imposed chains that bind them - 2018 was all about planting the seeds of mental freedom and in 2019 those seeds grow to fruition! I believe we'll all feel more free to be our most authentic selves, self-doubt and self-judgment will dissipate, and all the "shoulds" we hold against ourselves won't carry as much weight."

- Dr. Deganit Nuur, DAOM, L.Ac., MSTOM, Clairvoyant, Acupuncturist, Metaphysical Teacher

CURIOUS – “ I believe that following our curiosity is what guides us naturally in the direction of our most aligned and fulfilling life. For me, staying curious means keeping an open heart and mind, which creates space for possibilities we didn't even know existed."

- Ruby Warrington, Founder of The Numinous and Author of Sober Curious: The Blissful Sleep, Greater Focus, Limitless Presence, and Deep Connection Awaiting Us All On The Other Side of Alcohol

WOMAN EMPOWERED – “Woman working together to raise each other and support one another dreams and efforts is what I am focused on for 2019."

- Sabra Seligman, Owner of Manna Life Food, Holistic wellness expert, Plant-based nutrition coach

FAITH – “There have been many years in my life where I have completely lost faith in myself, my health, my loved ones and my purpose. This past year was a process of rebuilding that faith and I want to establish a strong foundation of faith in 2019. Faith in myself, my strong body, the loves in my life and the work I am meant to do here on earth."

- Nitika Chopra, Talk Show Host & Chronic Illness Advocate

RESILIENCE - “In a culture where we duck and dive difficulty, turmoil or failure, it's important to recognize that avoiding said setbacks is futile. Victory and progress lie in the hands of those that acknowledge the role of failure as a mentor that builds our strength and character. In my opinion, resilience is the greatest quality one can possess because it makes the bounce back faster each and every time."

- Hugette Montesinos, CEO of Disfunkshion Magazine, Speaker, Educator

Try this exercise for yourself as you start the new year. Think of this word as a way to create a lasting lifestyle mindset shift, not a short-term personal development “diet". Write this word out, put it up in places where you will be reminded of it and think of the many ways that you can embody this word in your life.

Reflect on this word. Ask yourself the following questions:

Why did you choose this word?

What will you do to embody this word?

What books can you read or listen via audiobooks to stay focused on this word?

What podcasts or audiobooks can you listen to so that you stay focused on this word?

What activities can you engage in to stay focused on this word?

Who can you surround yourself with that will keep you focused on this word?

What events can you go to that will help to stay focused on this word?

What media can you watch to stay focused on this word?

Which social media accounts can you follow to keep you focused on this word?

How will this word affect how you show up in your life, business and relationships?

What affirmations can you recite each day that will keep you focused on this word?

How will your life positively change by staying focused on this word throughout the entire year?

Stay focused on your word of the year and you'll create lasting habits and mindset shifts that will positively impact your life and business!

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Politics

Corporate Leaders Need Get Serious About Gun Violence

As the CEO of JOOR, the leading platform for wholesale business management, I spend my days immersed in the fashion industry. I'm used to weighing in on things like technology decisions, e-commerce trend, and the importance of real-time data.


But I'm also a citizen, a woman, and a mom. As such, I'm affected by what goes on in the world around me.

In December, I watched grisly reports about Jersey City with despair, as gun violence is something I've been profoundly concerned about since the devastating events at Sandy Hook. This year marks the seventh anniversary of Sandy Hook, and heart-wrenchingly, these poor children have now been gone longer than they were alive.

Sadly, these events are far too common in the United States. Every year nearly 1,300 children are killed and 5,800 injured by guns in this country, according to a report issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 2017.

Translation? About 19 American children are shot on average every single day. As a mother and as a professional, I am absolutely appalled that nothing is being done to stop this terrifying trend.

I think about this when I sit down with my family for dinner each night. Frankly, the idea of my kids facing an armed shooter at school or in any public place is terrifying to me. And it's terrifying to them.

It may not be in my job description, but as a business leader, I have a responsibility to speak out on what is clearly a humanitarian issue. My feelings on this issue have nothing to do with politics. I'm disturbed that this has become such a partisan issue. I simply don't want to live in a country where 19 children are gunned down every day of the year, and I can't believe anyone else does either.

We're now seeing a trend of corporate leaders owning their power and responsibility by becoming social leaders as well. Peter Horst, consultant and founder of CMO Network, recently said that "in a world where they no longer expect the government to fix things, people are turning to Corporate America to step in and do some good."

Business Roundtable even supported this trend by expanding their "statement on the purpose of the corporation." The document now says that along with shareholders, companies should also consider employees, customers and the community as stakeholders whose interests should be included in decision-making. These are the people who are sending their children to school all over the country today. Just as I send my kids off each morning. It is refreshing that businesses are getting involved to advocate on their employees' behalf.

Along the same lines, I'm especially heartened to see private sector leaders taking action on the issue of gun control. In September 2018, Chip Bergh, CEO of Levi Straus & Co., pledged more than $1 million to American nonprofit organizations dedicated to ending gun violence. Bergh made this decision in spite of the risk that it could alienate consumers; the moral stakes were too high.

I applauded Walmart's decision to end the sale of handguns and handgun ammunition as well as their request to stop open carry in their stores. And I was moved by Dick's Sporting Goods' destruction of over $5 million in military-style, semi-automatic rifles. Both actions came after the horrific shootings last August in El Paso and Southaven.

Despite all these signs of hope and progress, we are not moving forward nearly fast enough on the issue of gun control. Other than a few states passing red flag laws, little to nothing has really been accomplished, and now Jersey City is just another gruesome reminder.

If we, as a country, are serious about stopping mass shootings, we have to disengage from partisan politics and commit to truly protecting our families and communities from gun violence. With so much media coverage and debate, it's shameful we've made so little progress in solving the problem.

We know that gun deaths and injuries can be reduced, because we've seen it happen in other places. Yes, cultures vary, and each country must develop solutions that are unique to its own specific cultural context. But we can learn from nations like Australia, Britain, Norway, and Japan.

Research institutions can provide unbiased help moving forward. For example, the Rockefeller Institute conducted an in-depth study on mass shootings and developed a list of 19 strategies for intervention based on its findings. Each and every one of us must learn about gun laws in our states and advocate for strong research-based legislation that will make the changes we so desperately need.

It's time to set aside partisan fighting, roll up our sleeves, and craft solutions that allow our families to feel safe going to school, church, the market, or any other public place. It's time to take the Sandy Hook Promise, something I did after marching with the organization, and help them fulfill their mission:

"I promise to do all I can to protect children from gun violence by encouraging and supporting solutions that create safer, healthier homes, schools, and communities." - Sandy Hook Promise