#SWAAYthenarrative

6 Reasons Why You Didn't Get a Call Back After a Job Interview

Career

Job interviews are the bane of many people's existence due to the fact the person on the other side of the table is out rightly judging you. So what happens when you are fresh off a great job interview only to discover an email from the hiring manager alerting you the job has been filled. What could have gone wrong? Turns out a whole lot and most of the time it isn't within your control. Here's what you should keep in mind before the what if's start floating around your head.


1

You weren't qualified

The most obvious reason why you would have been passed over for a job was that you simply were not the most qualified person they came across on their search. Or according to Alison Doyle, Job Search Expert for The Balance, you may have been overqualified. Doyle says, “You may have been as qualified as other applicants, but the hiring manager may not have perceived as a good fit for the company culture."

2

The budget was cut

Companies are not perfect. Sometimes they put plans into motion that are not secure. Maybe they were banking on a new client that would bring in a ton of work, and of course budget for a new role to help out with that work. According to Vicki Salemi, Monster's Career Expert, “Finance may have realized after the fact that budgets are on hold (a.k.a. there's a hiring freeze) for the rest of the fiscal year."

3

You came off as negative

Companies are looking for people who have great energy. Doyle points out that what raises the most red flags when it comes to hiring are people who tend to talk with negativity. “If you speak negatively about your current or previous jobs, bosses, or companies, the interviewer won't be impressed," says Doyle. This makes sense since they wouldn't want you bad mouthing them if you became an employee. “The other way to raise a red flag is to make the interview all about you and what you want, instead of about what you can do for the company. Keep it positive, and remember that you need to sell the interviewer on why you would be the ideal candidate for the job," says Doyle.

4

They hired from within

It's possible that businesses cast a wide net in their search for applicants only to promote someone who already works there. “There could have been a candidate who was referred and strongly recommended by a current employee. The company could have hired internally," says Doyle. It makes sense for companies to hire from their employee pool since salary increase and training will cost them a whole lot less.

5

You weren't honest

Hiring managers have experience dealing with people aren't telling the whole truth. They can read your body language, your sentence patterns and based on their insight assume you aren't being entirely honest. “I always knew when candidates didn't have experience because they didn't directly answer a question about it. They talked loquaciously around the answer and gave a really verbose response compared to all of their other responses instead of simply saying, “I haven't encountered that program yet, but I'm a quick learner," says Salemi.

6

You came off as dull

Considering people spend upwards of 70% of their time at work it comes as no surprise that hiring managers are looking for professionals with a good personality. Someone they can chit chat with, communicate ideas to or kill time with on a business trip. “You may be incredible on paper but in person not be able to make connections with people you're interviewing with, especially after two or more rounds of interviews. Remember, they're people," says Salemi. Understandably, the mix of being professional and showing off your personality can be challenging when you are on a job interview, but you need to it off as much as your skills. Make sure to incorporate a bit of small talk to create a connection. Salemi acknowledges, “Often times when two candidates have nearly identical resumes, the one that gets the job is the person who the hiring managers liked most, and who they could see them fitting in with the group well."

If you didn't get the job don't let it discourage you from your job search. The best thing you can do is use it as practice. Do your best to course correct for future positions. Stay upbeat, create a connection and as hard as it might be, do not take it personally.

6 Min Read
Politics

All My Life I've Had To Fight

I live the pain and stress of being black in America every day: I am a black woman, the mother of a black son, sister to black men, and aunt to my black nephews. I remember what it was like as a young girl to be afraid to go to Howard Beach for fear of being chased out. I know what it's like to walk on Liberty Avenue and be called "nigger" and being so young that I didn't understand what the word meant, I had to ask my mother. I know too well that feeling in the pit of your stomach when a police car pulls up behind you and even though you know you haven't done anything wrong you fear that your life may be in danger from what should be a simple encounter. Like all African Americans, I am tired of this burden.

African Americans have a long history of having to fight for our humanity in America. We have had to fight for freedom, we have had to fight for equality, and we have had to fight for our lives. The fight continues to go on. I have often quoted that line from the character Sophia in Alice Walker's The Color Purple, "All my life I had to fight." When I say this to my white counterparts it can sometimes be uncomfortable because it's clear that they just don't get it. They view it as melodramatic. But it's not. It's part of the black experience, and it is the part of the black experience that black people don't want.

I have often quoted that line from the character Sophia in Alice Walker's The Color Purple, "All my life I had to fight."

While I was out yesterday, passing out PPE and talking to people, a woman asked me, "What is it going to take for this to change?" I told her that I think peaceful protesting is a good start. But it's just the start. We can't elect the same people for the past 20-30 years, some in the same positions, and then talk about how nothing has changed in the past 30 years.

This injustice, inequality, and inequity will not spontaneously disappear. It will take bold, outspoken, and fearless leadership to eradicate the systemic racism in our country. We must address the violence at the hands of a police force paid to serve and protect us. We must address the recurring experience of black people being passed over for a promotion and then being asked to train the white person who was hired. We must address the inequities in contract opportunities available to black businesses who are repeatedly deemed to lack the capacity. We must address the disparity in the quality of education provided to black students. We must address the right to a living wage, health care, and sick pay.

While we like to regard the system as broken, I've come to believe the system is working exactly as it was meant to for the people who are benefiting from it. We need a new system. One that works for all of us. I am running to become the mayor of New York City because I can't assume there's another person who has the courage to do the work that needs to be done to create a fair and just city.

We can't elect the same people for the past 20-30 years, some in the same positions, and then talk about how nothing has changed in the past 30 years.

There are some things we may not be able to change in people, but at this moment I think that whether you are black, white, purple, or yellow we all should be looking internally to see what is one thing that you can do to change this dynamic. Here's where we can start:

If we want change, we need a total reform of police departments throughout this country. That is going to require taking a hard look at our requirements to become a police officer, our disciplinary procedures when civilian complaints are filed, and a review of what and how we police. No one deserves to lose their life based upon the accusation of carrying counterfeit cash. We also need to hold police officers accountable for their actions. While it is their duty to protect and serve they should not be above the law. Even at this very moment, police officers are overstepping their boundaries.

If we want change, we have to build a sense of camaraderie between the police and community. A sense of working together and creating positive experiences. We have to be honest about the fact that we haven't allowed that to happen because we have utilized our police department as a revenue-generating entity. We are more concerned with cops writing tickets than protecting and serving. Even during these moments of protest we are witness to the differences made when the police supported the protesters and stood hand in hand with them or took a knee. It resulted in less violence and more peaceful protest. People felt heard; people felt respected; people felt like they mattered.

While we like to regard the system as broken, I've come to believe the system is working exactly as it was meant to for the people who are benefiting from it. We need a new system.

If we want change, we have to be willing to clean house. And that means that some of you are going to have to step up to the plate and take roles of leadership. In my city alone, there are 35 city council seats that are term-limited in 2021. There are some that aren't termed but maybe their term should be up. Step up to the plate and run. If nothing else it will let our elected officials see that they need to stop being comfortable and do more. We don't need you out in the street taking selfies or reporting the problems to us. We need solutions. We need you in a room implementing policies that will ensure that these things don't continue to happen.

If we want change, we need to support grassroots candidates that are not in corporate pockets, who are not taking PAC money, and who really want to make a difference to their community. We need candidates that know first-hand and can relate to the experiences that many of us are going through.

We are at a pivotal moment. It is inspiring to see people from all races and backgrounds in the streets protesting, standing up for justice, and wanting to see change. We must seize this moment, but we must also be mindful that change requires more.

People often ask me why I decided to run for office? I am running for me. I am running for the little girl that was called nigger on Liberty Avenue. For the woman who has been pulled over for no reason. For my nephew who was consistently stopped during the era of stop and frisk. I am running for your son, your brother, and your nephew. I am running so that the next generation will never have to say, "All my life I had to fight." Because although we won't stop until we see justice and changes that address inequality and inequity effectively, this fight is exhausting.